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Hoard of 41 Roman solidi discovered in a Dutch orchard

June 12, 2017 in Ancient Coins, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Coins, Collecting, Education, Gold, Gold Coins, History, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Precious Metals, Rare Coins, Roman Coins, Treasure, World Coins

By: Coin Update News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

The Dutch website de Volksrant reports (in a June 2 article by Geertje Dekkers) on the disclosure of a 41-piece gold hoard unearthed in an orchard in Gelderland. Based on certain of the gold solidi—those from the brief rule of Majorian (457–461)—experts believe the coins were buried around 460 AD. At that time, the Netherlands region was in the western part of the Roman Empire, which was in its final days. Lacking its former might, the empire engaged the locals in the far reaches of its territory to defend against invaders; in the case of the Netherlands, the Romans… Full article at the source>

Source: News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

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WGS Interview

February 28, 2017 in Ancient Coins, Archaeology, Blogs, Coins, Collecting, Education, History, Numismatica, Numismatics, Opinion, Rare Coins, World Coins

By: Wayne G. Sayles Ancient Coin Collecting

http://blog.coinsupplyplanet.com/interview-wayne-sayles/

I recently came across an interview that I did a few years ago for CoinSupplyPlanet.com and thought it may be worth sharing here since it is still as relevant as the day it was recorded.

The full interview can be viewed and read at
http://blog.coinsupplyplanet.com/interview-wayne-sayles/ … Full article at the source>

Source: Ancient Coin Collecting (Wayne G. Sayles)

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Archaeologists Question Media Sensationalism

October 18, 2016 in Ancient Coins, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Blogs, Coins, Collecting, Education, History, Investing, Legislation, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Opinion, Politics, US Government, USA Coins, World Coins

By: Wayne G. Sayles Ancient Coin Collecting (Wayne G. Sayles)

Ancient coin collectors in the United States had good reason to smile this past weekend. Archaeologist Paul Barford in his blog Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues joined a growing list of critics who believe that U.S. government officials are being swayed by false information. Specifically, Mr. Barford cites major media reports regarding ISIS funding as tainting a recent Congressional Homeland Security Committee Report with “outdated information, misrepresented statistics, and discredited figures.” He goes on to suggest that congressional staffers who authored the report “…searched for reports published in major media outlets without critically examining… Full article at the source>

Source: Ancient Coin Collecting (Wayne G. Sayles)

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An Intellectual Curiosity

March 3, 2016 in Ancient Coins, Anthropology, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Art, Blogs, Coins, Collecting, Education, History, Numismatica, Numismatics, Opinion, Treasure, World Coins

By: Wayne G. Sayles Ancient Coin Collecting

“We treat all stakeholders with a vested interest in the site with the same intellectual curiosity, which means we interact with and learn from local populations, dealers, collectors, looters, government employees, archaeologists, museum professionals, tourists, and customs agents.”

Morag Kersal, Archaeologist and Assistant Professor at DePaul University

http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/02/2016/monitoring-looting-in-jordan-using-drones

Treating ancient coin collectors with intellectual curiosity is an interesting way for Professor Moreg to describe interaction with a learning discipline that is older than any university in the world. Some of the foremost names in international leadership, social justice, art, science, literature, philanthropy, commerce and virtually every other facet of life were… Full article at the source>

Source: Ancient Coin Collecting (Wayne G. Sayles)

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Funding Terrorism

January 29, 2016 in Ancient Coins, Anthropology, Archaeology, Blogs, Coins, Collecting, Education, Foreign Policy, History, Investing, Legal, Numismatica, Numismatics, Opinion

By: Wayne G. Sayles Ancient Coin Collecting (Wayne G. Sayles)

In the wake of the U.S. Senate’s Finance Committee passage of a bill “to protect and preserve international cultural property at risk due to political instability, armed conflict, or natural and other disasters, and for other purposes.” Every thinking American ought to give some serious thought to the part that includes “for other purposes”. The situation in Syria and Iraq is deplorable, but it is not going to be resolved by yellow journalism or poorly conceived import restrictions. Couched within this appeal for egalitarian protection of the past is a blatant and disgustingly sub-rosa agenda pushed incessantly… Full article at the source>

Source: Ancient Coin Collecting (Wayne G. Sayles)

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Money of the Bible: A “Numismatic Chronicle of Events” That Astounds and Enlightens

December 10, 2015 in Ancient Coins, Archaeology, Books, Coins, Collecting, Education, Entertainment, History, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, World Coins

By: Dennis Tucker News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

Money of the Bible

Cover of Money of the Bible, 3rd ed

Money of the Bible has established itself as a most valuable reference and sumptuous art book dedicated to both numismatics and Biblical studies,” wrote Dr. Paul Rynearson in this outstanding book’s foreword. “You will discover fascination on every page.”

The remarkable volume by Kenneth Bressett was awarded the Numismatic Literary Guild’s top prize of “Best Specialized Book, World Coins.”

It’s not only professional numismatists and researchers who give the book high praise. These comments are from reviews posted by everyday collectors on Amazon.com:

“Well worth the price and a GREAT coffee table book.”… Full article at the source>

Source: News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

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No One Knows the Secrets of Gold Spirals Found in Denmark

July 19, 2015 in Anthropology, Archaeology, Blogs, Gold, History, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Precious Metals, Treasure, Treasure Hunting

By: Nick Liberty Coin and Currency Blog

gold spirals 580x360

Thousands of mysterious gold spirals have been found in Zealand, Denmark. A little while back, a team of archeologists found four Bronze Age gold bracelets there. The archeologists thought they were done, so they handed the site over to amateur archaeologist Christian Albertsen. But Albertsen believed there was more to be discovered. And he was right. There was a lot more.

All in all, Albertsen located around 2,000 gold spirals. The hoard weighed in at between 200 and 300 grams. Experts believe the spirals are from between 900 and 700 B.C. during the Bronze Age. While the date and size of… Full article at the source>

Source: Liberty Coin and Currency Blog

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Man Finds Nazi-Era Coin Hoard Worth 45,000 Euros in Northern Germany

July 19, 2015 in Anthropology, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Austrian Coins, Belgian coins, Coins, France Coins, Gold, Gold Coins, History, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Treasure, Treasure Hunting, World Coins

By: Coin Update News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

leo

Last October, Florian Bautsch was walking with his metal detector when he stumbled upon an unusual gold piece in Lüneburg, Germany, south of Hamburg. Piqued, he kept searching, eventually discovering nine more of the coins—enough to spur him to notify local archaeologists that he might be on to something big.

After a two-week excavation, the archaeologists did find something big: a trove of 207 gold coins buried one meter deep at the foot of a tree. Bearing stamps from Belgium, France, Italy, and the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the coins had been buried in separate pouches that had deteriorated except for their seals, Full article at the source>

Source: News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

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Ancient Roman Treasure Found on Irish Beach

June 27, 2015 in Ancient Coins, Archaeology, Blogs, Coins, Collecting, Gold, History, Numismatica, Numismatics, Roman Coins, Silver

By: Nick (Liberty Coin and Currency Blog)

roman treasure ireland 580x360 (1)

It’s officially beach season. So get your swim trunks, towel, sunblock, and… metal detector? Well, the metal detector may not be absolutely necessary, but it’s not a bad idea if you want to find some buried treasure. Irish retiree Brian Murray brought along his metal detector on his trip to the beach, and it paid off big time.

Murray discovered two extravagant Roman gold rings, and a silver belt buckle along the shores of Dundrum Bay in Murlough, an area in Northern Ireland famed for its natural beauty. “I was actually collecting militaria on the shores of Murlough — it was Full article at the source>

Source: Liberty Coin and Currency Blog

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Polish Forest Ranger Finds 6,000 Silver Coins

May 11, 2015 in Ancient Coins, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Blogs, Coins, Collecting, History, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Precious Metals, Rare Coins, Silver, Silver Coins, Treasure, Treasure Hunting, World Coins

By: Admin Liberty Coin and Currency Blog

Centuries ago someone in what is now Poland amassed quite a collection of silver coins. For some unknown reason, the owner of this massive hoard of silver coins decided to hide them in two pots deep in the forest. Whoever hid the coins did an exceptional job, because no one found them — until now. […] Full article at the source>

Source: Liberty Coin and Currency Blog

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CCPIA: Then and Now

May 7, 2015 in Ancient Coins, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Blogs, Collecting, Education, History, Legal, Numismatica, Numismatics, Opinion, US Government, USA Coins, World Coins

By:  (Ancient Coin Colleting Blog)

The Convention on Cultural Property Implementation Act of 1983 (CCPIA) has been in effect for more than 30 years and was massaged through the legislative process over a 13-year span. The fact that this law has withstood many challenges and is still regarded by most as a fair and well thought out piece of legislation, places it in a class with few parallels. The reason for that can surely be ascribed in part to a deliberative process in its creation that focussed intently on well articulated concerns from diverse interests.

Mark Feldman representing the U.S. State Department before… Full article at the source>

Source: Coin Collecting Alltop.com

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Curator’s Choice: The Yorkshire archaeology Hoards which are going global with Google

November 7, 2014 in Ancient Coins, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Art, Bronze, Bronze Coins, Coins, Collecting, Education, English Coins, Gold, Gold Coins, Museums, Numismatica, Numismatics, Precious Metals, Rare Coins, Roman Coins, Silver, Silver Coins, Treasure, Treasure Hunting, World Coins

By: http://www.culture24.org.uk/ November 6th, 2014.

Curator’s Choice: Andrew Woods, Curator of Numismatics for York Museums Trust, on the Yorkshire Museum’s collection of Yorkshire Hoards going global with Google

“The numismatic collection – money and medals – numbers over 40,000 objects and is one of the strongest in northern England.

Most of that material has been excavated with new finds coming up every year from farmers, metal detectorists and archaeologists.

A lot of that excavated material comes in the form of hoards – accumulations of wealth buried in the ground.

Yorkshire Hoards is a project between Google Cultural Institute and York Museums Trust looking at these hoards and what they can tell us about the history of the region.

Over the past 3,000 years, from the Bronze Age through to the 17th century, very large numbers of hoards have gone into the ground across Yorkshire.

Full article at the source>

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Scuba Diver Finds Oldest Coin in Bulgaria

September 10, 2014 in Ancient Coins, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Coins, Gold, Gold Coins, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Precious Metals, Rare Coins, Silver, Silver Coins, World Coins

By: Sofia News Agency. 09/10/2014 (http://www.novinite.com)

An ancient coin believed to be the oldest one found so far in Bulgaria has been discovered in the Black Sea just off the town of Sozopol.

According to Vladimir Penchev, numismatist at the National History Museum (NHM) in Sofia, the coin made of electrum (a gold/silver alloy) can be dated back to the second half of the 7th century BC as originating from the kingdom of Lydia which means it is at least 2,650 years old.

Full article at the source>

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Roman coins discovered in Bath, go on tour.

August 28, 2014 in Ancient Coins, Anthropology, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Numismatica, Numismatics, Precious Metals, Rare Coins, Roman Coins, Silver, Silver Coins, Treasure

By Bath Chronicle. August 27, 2014 (http://www.bathchronicle.co.uk/)

Budding historians will be given the chance to examine a collection of silver Roman coins when the Beau Street hoard goes on tour this autumn.

The hoard, which includes 17,577 silver coins, was excavated by archaeologists on the site of the new Gainsborough Hotel in Beau Street, Bath, in 2007.

In March the council was awarded a grant of £372,500 from The Heritage Lottery Fund to purchase the hoard and put it on display.

Full article at the source>

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Marvelous Rarities and Collections at Gorny & Mosch

August 27, 2014 in Ancient Coins, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Art, Auctions, Coins, Coins for sale, Collecting, History, Medals, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, World Coins

By Coin Update

Be it an ox hide ingot, a unique silver medallion of Trajan, the largest collection of religious amulets and medals the market has ever seen or a nicely assorted collection of numismatics: Gorny & Mosch has spectacular offers for its October sale.

Make sure to keep the week from 13 to 17 October, 2014, free! For there will be something spectacular at Gorny & Mosch’s agenda. Auction sale #224 offers magnificent rarities dating from ancient Full article and pictures at the source>

Source:: News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

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Jersey hoard: Archaeologists unpick 70,000 coins

August 23, 2014 in Ancient Coins, Anthropology, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Coins, History, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Treasure, Treasure Hunting, World Coins

Work to separate 70,000 Celtic coins and pieces of jewellery is taking place under the public gaze at Jersey Museum.

 

Researchers aim to remove and clean up to 500 coins a week for the next three years in a specially built glass-walled lab.

The metal detector enthusiasts who made the find are now part of the team working on the project.

They unearthed the hoard, though to be the world’s largest, in 2012 in a field in Grouville.

For the past two years the team, led by Jersey Heritage conservator Neil Mahrer, has been documenting the hoard, which is about 2,000 years old.

Full article, pictures and video at the source>

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Rare Coins Bear Scars of Ancient Jewish Rebellion

August 5, 2014 in Ancient Coins, Anthropology, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Bronze, Bronze Coins, Coins, History, Israel Coins, Numismatica, Numismatics, Treasure

By Jeanna Bryner. August 5th, 2014 (http://www.livescience.com/)

A Late Second Temple Period Jewish settlement with a trove of rare bronze coins inside one of its houses has been discovered in Israel.

The 114 bronze coins, which were found inside a ceramic money box and hidden in the corner of a room, date to the fourth year of the Great Revolt of the Jews against the Romans — an uprising that destroyed the Temple on Tisha B’Av about 2,000 years ago, the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) reported today (Aug. 5).

Full article at the source>

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Hoard of rare coins from Roman and Iron Age periods found in British cave

July 7, 2014 in Ancient Coins, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Coins, Gold, Gold Coins, History, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Rare Coins, Roman Coins, Silver, Silver Coins, Treasure, World Coins

By Descrier Staff.

A hoard of 26 rare coins from the Roman and Iron Age periods in a cave in Derbyshire by a member of the public.

The trove is the first time that Roman coins that predate the invasion of Britain in AD 43 and gold and silver pieces from the Corieltavi tribe have been found together.

The cache, which has been declared a “treasure” by authorities, has prompted a full excavation of the site in Dovedale.

British Museum’s curator of Iron Age and Roman coins, Ian Leins, said:

“Although this is a much smaller hoard than the similar finds made at Hallaton in 2000, this has been declared treasure and is an exciting discovery given the puzzling location in a cave and the fact that it lies beyond the main circulation area of the coinage.”

Full article at the source>

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Spain Lays Out Silver Won from U.S. Treasure-Hunters

June 14, 2014 in Antique Coins, Archaeology, Coins, Museums, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Precious Metals, Rare Coins, Ship Wrecks, Silver, Silver Coins, Spain Coins, Treasure, Treasure Hunting, World Coins

By: Naharnet Newsdesk. June 13th, 2014. (http://www.naharnet.com/)

Spain has proudly put on show tens of thousands of silver coins from a 19th-century shipwreck that it won back in court from U.S. treasure hunters.

The country’s soon-to-be king, Felipe, and future queen Letizia on Thursday launched the exhibition in central Madrid celebrating the return of the sunken treasure to Spain.

They viewed treasures and documents that tell the story of how British warships blew up the Nuestra Senora de las Mercedes, sending its precious cargo to the bottom of the sea.

The highlight of the show, in the basement of Madrid’s recently reopened National Archaeological Museum, is a glass case containing heaps of more than 30,000 tarnished silver coins.

The cargo came to Spain in 2012 after a five-year legal battle with Odyssey, the U.S. company that hauled it up two centuries after it sank.

Full article at the source>

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A history of the world in 100 objects: The coins of Croesus

June 2, 2014 in Ancient Coins, Anthropology, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Coins, Collecting, Education, Gold, Gold Coins, History, Numismatica, Numismatics, Precious Metals, Rare Coins, World Coins

By: Anna Seaman June 2nd, 2014. (http://www.thenational.ae)

Made of electrum, an alloy of gold and silver, the coins of King Croesus were the some of the earliest to be issued. Rather crudely fashioned by a few blows of a hammer, the rounded golden lumps date back to 550BC. They were minted in what is now Turkey, in the latter period of the reign of King Croesus, who conquered the Iron Age kingdom of Lydia.

The image of a lion and a bull fighting in profile can be seen on the face of the coin; this was an indication of the purity of the metal, which lifted the responsibility for checking the individual coins from the businessman to the ruler, elevating the kingdom’s position to trade and making King Croesus extremely wealthy.

Full article and pictures at the source>

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Mould for minting Roman coins found in Talkad

May 19, 2014 in Ancient Coins, Anthropology, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Coins, Counterfeit, Education, Fake Coins, Numismatic Crimes, Numismatica, Numismatics, Roman Coins, World Coins

By: Akram Mohammed, Mysore, May 19, 2014 (http://www.deccanherald.com)
For those who think financial fraud or circulating fake currencies is a modern day phenomenon, an ancient Roman coin mould on display at the Department of Archaeology, Museums and Heritage in the city is a startling revelation.

 

The Roman coin mould, which is being displayed for the first time since its excavation in 1993, indicates that fake coins were in circulation around 19 to 20 centuries ago. The terracotta mould is among the most important objects displayed at the exhibition, apart from terracotta figurines, iron objects, bronze dies, stone beads.

M S Krishnamurthy, a retired professor of Archaeology who led the team that unearthed the mould, told Deccan Herald that it was a mould for Roman coins in circulation during the first century AD. “The coins probably were minted either during the period of Augustus or his son Tiberius,” he said.

Full article at the source>

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Decade on, coins to go public – Numismatists to study Nabarangpur treasure

May 12, 2014 in Ancient Coins, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Coins, Gold, Gold Coins, Indian Coins, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Precious Metals, Rare Coins, Silver, Silver Coins, Treasure, World Coins

By: Namita Panda. May 11th, 2014 (http://www.telegraphindia.com/)

Bhubaneswar, May 11: Ancient coins unearthed a decade earlier in Nabarangpur district will be displayed at the State Museum and also be researched upon by numismatists and epigraphists.

The rare coins, which are now in the safe custody of the Nabarangpur district treasury, will shortly be supplied to the State Museum for detailed study, said sources at the state culture department.

In 2003-04, villagers discovered the rare coins near Kosagumuda in the district when present state tourism and culture secretary Arabinda Padhee was the collector there.

“The collection that was unearthed by chance by the local residents included unique silver and gold coins that were clearly ancient,” reminisced Padhee.

“The coins have a few Persian symbols and emblems of a spider and other images that were most likely propagated on coins during the Mughal era, may be under Akbar’s reign,” he said.

The villagers, following local traditions, considered it a bad omen to find coins under the soil and were hence worried. “They believed that to reverse the negative energy of the coins, a small shrine had to be built. I asked them to hand over the coins to the district treasury and in return ensured that the local administration helped the villagers build the shrine. Ever since, the coins were safely kept in the treasury,” said Padhee.

Last week, he requested the superintendent of the State Museum to collect the coins from the district collector of Nabarangpur so they are studied by experts and also displayed at both the district and state museums.

Full article at the source>

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700-year-old coin found during Bannockburn dig

April 9, 2014 in Ancient Coins, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Coins, Collecting, English Coins, History, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Pennies, Rare Coins, Silver, Silver Coins, World Coins

By George Mair April 9th, 2014 (http://www.scotsman.com)

A 700-YEAR-OLD English coin has been found near the abbey where the victorious Robert the Bruce took booty from the Battle of Bannockburn.

The silver penny was discovered yards from Cambuskenneth Abbey, near Stirling, by archaeologists looking for artefacts from the time of the 1314 battle.

The small coin, minted in London during the late 13th or early 14th century, may have been a month’s wages for a soldier in Edward II’s defeated army.

Experts from GUARD Archaeology, who led a metal detector survey of the area, believe it may have been among the spoils of battle taken back to the abbey by the Bruce from the battlefield.

Warren Bailie, GUARD’s battlefield archaeologist, who led the search, said today: “This coin would have been in circulation in 1314 and could relate to the Battle of Bannockburn.

“Cambuskenneth Abbey was where the Scots’ baggage train was held before the battle and where they returned to immediately afterwards.

“It was where the booty was taken from the battlefield, so it could potentially have been dropped booty.

“It was worth quite a lot of money at that time — perhaps a soldier’s wage for that month.”

Cambuskenneth Abbey is one of the few places specifically mentioned in near contemporary accounts of the Battle of Bannockburn.

Full article at the source>

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Medieval coin is ‘earliest find’ at castle excavation

April 5, 2014 in Ancient Coins, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Coins, English Coins, History, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Pennies, Silver, Silver Coins, Treasure, World Coins

April 4th, 2014. Carrick Times. (www.carrickfergustimes.co.uk)

Archaeologists digging at Carrickfergus Castle have displayed their most exciting find yet with the discovery of a medieval silver coin.

The English short cross penny was uncovered in one of the excavation trenches last week as the eight-strong team nears the completion of the dig period.

The work is being undertaken by the Centre for Archaeological Fieldwork (CAF) at Queen’s University on behalf of the Northern Ireland Environment Agency.

Speaking to the Times last week, excavation director Ruairi O’Baoill said: “The coin dates from some time between 1200 to 1250, around the time of Henry II, Richard, John or Henry III. It’s the earliest artefact we’ve found so far.

“As it’s made from silver, I imagine the person who dropped it would have been annoyed to find they’d lost it!

Full article at the source>

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Naples Archeological Museum reveals ‘hidden’ treasure

March 14, 2014 in Ancient Coins, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Coins, Collecting, Gold, Gold Coins, Greek Coins, History, Medals, Museums, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Precious Metals, Rare Coins, Roman Coins, World Coins

Closed coin collection to be shown to the public on Sunday

Marh 14th, 2014  (http://www.ansamed.info/)

(ANSAmed) – NAPOLI – To hear talk of hidden treasure makes one think immediately of an old chest full of precious antique coins. This is exactly what awaits visitors to the National Archeological Museum of Naples on Sunday March 15, when the museum will open its doors to reveal a “secret” collection for one day – that of the museum’s coins, one of the most important collections in Italy with about 150,000 pieces, from coinage of ancient Greece to that of the Bourbon mint.

The name of the guided tour is “Coins and economy in the ancient world”. It is a rare opportunity rendered even more precious by the presence of archeologists and historians, experts in numismatics, who will explain not only the eras in which the coins were used, but also economic aspects linked to their use.

Coin collecting dates back to the 1500s, as demonstrates the Farnese collection, created in Rome but arriving in Naples through the Bourbon inheritance of Charles VII of Naples. The collection shows the choice of coins and medallions preferred by erudite and Renaissance coin collectors: portraits of illustrious men, architects of ancient history, representations of historic episodes and celebrated ancient monuments that have disappeared or are no longer identifiable. Another attentive and passionate collector was Cardinal Stefano Borgia, a learned prelate from the late eighteenth century with antiquarian interests, whose collection was sold by one of his descendants to the King of Naples Joachim Murat. The Borgia collection includes coins from series produced in Etruria, Umbria, Lazio, Rome and in the central Adriatic area of Italy.

Full article at the source>

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