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Is there a fortune hiding in your change jar?

May 15, 2017 in Blogs, Cents, Coins, Collecting, Dimes, Education, Numismatica, Numismatics, Opinion, Pennies, Rare Coins, USA Coins, World Coins

By: Tegna Liberty Coin and Currency Blog

Many people probably have a jar, bucket or piggy bank where they keep all the change they’ve acquired over the years. Sometimes we collect it just to get it out of our wallets. Other times we do it to save up for a large purchase. Often, though, we don’t pay much attention to which coins make it into our change banks, meaning you probably don’t know if you have some truly valuable coins hiding inside. Before you lose that jar in your next move or convert it all to cash at your nearest bank, be sure to sift through it… Full article at the source>

Source: Liberty Coin and Currency Blog

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Stack’s Bowers Galleries to offer finest certified 1913 Lincoln cent at auction

March 14, 2017 in Antique Coins, Auctions, Cents, Coin Shows, Coins, Coins for sale, Collecting, Copper, Copper Coins, Education, History, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Pennies, Rare Coins, USA Coins

By: Coin Update News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

When the Whitman Coin & Collectibles Baltimore Expo takes place at the end of March, it will, as always, feature an estimable array of collectible coins and paper money. Stack’s Bowers Galleries will hold a series of auctions, and its “Rarities Night” will, as usual, offer up a host of beautiful coins. Among those that are not “as usual” will be a 1913 Lincoln cent in nearly flawless condition—in fact, at MS-67 RD, it is the finest certified example of that year.

On the Stack’s Bowers blog, numismatist and cataloger James McCartney writes, With a mintage of 76.5… Full article at the source>

Source: News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

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Collecting on a Budget: Affordable Indian Head Cents

April 26, 2016 in Bronze Coins, Cents, Coins, Collecting, Collector Sets, Copper, Copper Coins, Cupro-Nickel Coins, Education, History, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Rare Coins, Silver, Silver Coins, USA Coins

By: Dennis Hengeveld News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

Cent1859small

We are continuing our series on interesting coins costing less than $100 with what is arguably America’s most loved and hated denomination: the cent. We have discussed the Lincoln Wheat cent series in an earlier article, and now we will go further back in time to the Indian Head cent series, which was produced from 1859 to 1909.

These coins played an important role in American commerce over a 50-year period that began before the Civil War and ended in the 20th century. Produced in large quantities most years, there are several rare and scarce dates, some of which… Full article at the source>

Source: News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

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The Lincoln cent 1959 – 2016

April 25, 2016 in Antique Coins, Blogs, Cents, Coins, Collecting, Copper, Copper Coins, Education, History, Numismatica, Numismatics, Pennies, Rare Coins, US Mint, USA Coins

By: Libertycoin Liberty Coin and Currency Blog

1959 Proof Penny

Starting in 1959, The Mint starting stamping the back of the penny with the image of the Lincoln Memorial. The year 1959 was the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s birth. From 1959–1962 the penny was made up of 95% copper, 5% tin and zinc. However, from 1962–1982, the composition of the penny was changed by removing the tin, making the penny 95% copper and 5% zinc. They all would weigh in at 3.11 grams. The pennies made from 1982 to present, weigh 2.5 grams and are made up of 97.5% zinc and 2.5% copper, most of which is a pure… Full article at the source>

Source: Liberty Coin and Currency Blog

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Australians take pride in their 1911 penny

March 23, 2016 in Antique Coins, Australian Coins, Blogs, Cents, Coins, Collecting, Education, History, Numismatica, Numismatics, Opinion, Perth Mint, World Coins

By: Andrew Crellin Perth Mint Blog

The penny is easily the most collected of all Australian coins. First circulated in 1911 for the new monarch, King George V, it was one of six new Commonwealth denominations to replace British coinage from 1910. Today it holds a sentimental place in the heart of everyone that lived in the days before dollars and cents. In 1911 it gave citizens of the young Australian nation every reason to be proud.

A Royal Comrade of Australians

Although Australians have warmly regarded each British monarch since George III, George V (r. 1910 – 1936) seems to have held a special place among them.

A… Full article at the source>

Source: Perth Mint Blog

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PCGS Analysis Confirms Two More Virtually Pure Copper Judd-2 1792 Pattern Cents

February 26, 2016 in Antique Coins, Cents, Coins, Collecting, Copper, Copper Coins, Education, Grading, History, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service), Press Releases, Rare Coins, US Mint, USA Coins

For immediate release
February 26, 2016

News media contact:
Steve Sloan, (949) 567-1223

PCGS Analysis Confirms Two More
Virtually Pure Copper Judd-2 1792 Pattern Cents

 

This 1792 J-2 pattern cent owned by California collector Alan Weinberg is nearly pure copper, according to PCGS. (Photo credit: PCGS CoinFacts.)

This 1792 J-2 pattern cent owned by California collector Alan Weinberg is nearly pure copper, according to PCGS. (Photo credit: PCGS CoinFacts.)

Professional Coin Grading Service (www.PCGS.com) recently had the unique opportunity to perform metallurgical testing on two different examples of the extremely rare 1792 Pattern Cent.  Both were shown to have been made of essentially pure copper instead of a “fusible alloy” containing copper and a small portion of silver.  

“The results give a clearer picture of how the U.S. Mint experimented on the earliest American coins in preparation for official coining in 1793.  At least three of the nine known 1792 Cents originally designated as the Judd-2 variety now are confirmed to be composed of virtually pure copper,” said Ron Guth, President of PCGS CoinFacts (www.PCGSCoinFacts.com), the Internet’s most comprehensive source for information about United States coins.

“This represents a major step forward in our understanding of early American numismatics, plus it was the first time these two rarities have been together in 224 years.  Working with the owners of the two 1792 cents, PCGS arranged for an in-house, non-invasive metallurgical analysis of their coins,” explained Guth.   

PCGS confirmed the Wolcott specimen 1792 J-2 cent is essentially pure copper. (Photo credit: PCGS CoinFacts.)

PCGS confirmed the Wolcott specimen 1792 J-2 cent is essentially pure copper. (Photo credit: PCGS CoinFacts.)

One of the recently tested Judd-2 cents has been owned by collector Alan Weinberg of California since 1988 when he purchased it at a Bowers and Merena auction.  Its pedigree includes the Lorin G. Parmelee, Virgil Brand and Norweb collections.  Although uncertified, PCGS estimates its grade as EF45, making it the second finest known.

The other recently tested coin, graded PCGS VF35, was unknown until 2004 when the Wolcott family from southwestern New York State brought their inherited coin to the American Numismatic Association World’s Fair of Money in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It was certified by PCGS and its discovery generated nationwide headlines.  Owners since then have included Anthony Terranova, Denis Loring, Legend Numismatics and Bob R. Simpson. The coin now is owned by a collector who wishes to remain anonymous after purchasing it through Heritage Auctions this past January.

A third Judd-2 1792 cent, confirmed to be pure copper, is in the American Numismatic Association Edward C. Rochette Money Museum collection, and graded Good.

Early United States Mint engraver Henry Voight, who also created the 1793 Chain and Wreath cent varieties, designed the Judd-2 variety.

Judd refers to the book, United States Pattern, Experimental and Trial Pieces, a reference guide authored by Dr. J. Hewitt Judd.  Coins listed in the book are classified by Judd numbers, including J-2, the current designation for 1792-dated cents made of pure copper.

“1792 saw a flurry of activity aimed at establishing a mint in the United States.  Congress passed a Mint Act, a Director was chosen, a parcel of land was purchased, a building was erected in Philadelphia and employees were hired,” explained Guth.

“Several one-cent denomination coins were tested that year: a large copper piece known today as the Birch Cent (Judd-4); a smaller copper piece with a silver center (Judd-1); a piece of similar size in pure copper (Judd-2); and a piece of similar size with the copper and the silver center cent melted together into what is known as a ‘fusible alloy’ (Judd did not create a separate listing for such a coin).”  

“Mint records point to their experiment with fusible alloy cents, but none have been confirmed to date (one example tested years ago showed a small fraction of silver, but the margin of error of the test precluded a positive determination).”

The search for a real Fusible Alloy cent continues.  “Hopefully,” concluded Guth, “testing of the remaining 1792 cents will reveal the true nature of these remarkable coins.”

Now celebrating its 30th anniversary since its founding in 1986, Professional Coin Grading Service has become the industry standard in third-party certification.  With offices in California, Shanghai, Hong Kong and Paris, PCGS experts have certified over 32 million coins with a total market value of over 30 billion dollars.

For additional information about PCGS products and services, call 800-447-8848 or email info@pcgs.com.  

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The Lincoln Cent

February 5, 2016 in Antique Coins, Blogs, Cents, Coins, Collecting, Copper, Copper Coins, Education, Entertainment, History, Numismatica, Numismatics, Pennies, Rare Coins, US Mint, USA Coins

By: Libertycoin Liberty Coin and Currency Blog

1909 Lincoln 1C 2

The Lincoln cent, or most commonly called “penny”, started production in 1909. They have President Abraham Lincoln on the front which is where the name “Lincoln Cent” comes from. Starting with the first year of 1909 the penny has wheat ears on the back and is commonly called a “Wheat Back Penny”. They are made of bronze, which consists of 95% copper and 5% tin.

In 1909, there were pennies that were struck in San Francisco and Philadelphia that had the designer’s initials on the back of the penny at the bottom that read “V.D.B”, which stood for “Victor David Brenner”.

The… Full article at the source>

Source: Liberty Coin and Currency Blog

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Perth Mint re-creates Stuart Devlin’s 1c & 2c coin designs in silver to mark 50th anniversary of decimalisation

January 5, 2016 in Australian Coins, Blogs, Cents, Coins, Coins for sale, Collecting, Collector Sets, Commemorative, Education, History, New Releases, Numismatica, Numismatics, Offers, Paper Money, Perth Mint, Precious Metals, Press Releases, Proof Coins, Silver, Silver Coins, World Coins

By: Blog Team Perth Mint Blog

50thAnn-AustralianDecimalCurrency-1Cent-Silver-Proof

On Valentine’s Day 1966, Australia introduced decimal currency.

A public information blitz had prepared people extremely well, and the changeover from pounds shillings and pence went remarkably smoothly.

For some the look and feel of the new decimal currency took a little getting used to. “The most common comment was that the notes looked like money used in the game Monopoly,” reported the Canberra Times.

“The coins are beautiful but the notes are shocking,” a voice had been heard exclaiming.

The original decimal paper notes have long since been replaced by polymer notes. But if you check your change there’s still a chance you’ll… Full article at the source>

Source: Perth Mint Blog

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Collecting on a Budget: Affordable Lincoln Wheat Cents

December 24, 2015 in Antique Coins, Cents, Coins, Coins for sale, Collecting, Collector Sets, Copper, Copper Coins, Education, History, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Pennies, USA Coins

By: Dennis Hengeveld News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

1909-s-vdb-LincolnSMALL

We are continuing our series on affordable options for the (beginning) collector with one of the most popular coin series in America. The Lincoln Wheat Cent series was first struck in 1909, and continued to be struck until 1958. A complete set is an attainable goal for many collectors, but can be daunting, as 144 different date/mintmark combinations are needed, some of which can become quite pricey. In this article I will suggest five coins that a collector might reasonably expect to purchase for less than $100. As we can see, some options only cost $20 or so, but prices… Full article at the source>

Source: News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

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Passionate Collecting

June 22, 2015 in Cents, Coins, Collecting, Collector Sets, Education, News, NGC (Numismatic Guaranty Corporation ), Numismatica, Numismatics, PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service), USA Coins, World Coins

By: Jeff Garrett News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

1794-silver-dollar

My introduction to numismatics began the “All-American” way in the mid 1970’s. A family friend gave me a Whitman folder for Lincoln Cents 1941 to date. Like millions of other kids before and since, I began to fill the holes in my album. In the 1970’s, finding most of the Lincoln cents for my budding collection was relatively easy. Every Friday after receiving my allowance, I would head to the bank for $5 worth of penny rolls. I repeated this process for months until my collection of 1941 to date Lincoln Cents was complete. Unfortunately, I lived in Florida, and… Full article at the source>

Source: News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

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Collecting on a modest budget still offers thrills

May 23, 2014 in Cents, Coin Dealers, Coins, Collecting, Copper Coins, Education, Numismatica, Numismatics, Quarters, US Mint, USA Coins

The Gold and Silver Mine By: Douglas Keefe. May 21st 2014. (www.shorenews.com)

Collecting coins doesn’t have to be an expensive endeavor (remember, I said collecting, not investing). There are many opportunities to collect United States coins on a modest budget.

One examples is Lincoln Cents starting from 1959, the year the design on the reverse of the coin changed from having two wheat stalks framing the words “One Cent” to the new design featuring the Lincoln Memorial. Although the earlier design with the wheat stalks, which were minted from 1909 until 1958, have virtually disappeared from circulation, the cents with the Lincoln Memorial are plentiful. So if someone wanted to start collecting these cents, they could purchase one of those inexpensive blue coin albums that have holes for each date and mint and then start going through their coins to try to fill all the openings in the album.

Full article at the source>

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Sacramento Coin Club Slips Rare Pennies Worth $80 Each Into Circulation

May 1, 2014 in Antique Coins, Cents, Coin Shows, Coins, Collecting, Conventions, News, Numismatic Societies and Clubs, Numismatica, Numismatics, Pennies, Rare Coins, USA Coins

By: Ron Jones. April 30th, 2014 (http://sacramento.cbslocal.com)

NATOMAS (CBS13) — There’s a penny floating around the Central Valley right now that’s worth $80.

Robert Shanks of the Sacramento Valley Coin Club says the group has dropped four rare pennies into circulation in advance of their 57th Spring Show in Natomas this week.

The four rare 1909 pennies bear an S, meaning they were minted in San Francisco. What makes it so rare is the wheat penny was only made between 1909 and 1958, meaning there aren’t many floating around in 2014.

Full Article at the source>

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The Gold and Silver Mine – A South Jersey counterfeiter who aimed low

February 4, 2014 in Cents, Coin Errors, Coins, Counterfeit, Education, Fake Coins, Nickel Coins, Numismatic Crimes, Numismatica, Numismatics, USA Coins

By: Douglas Keefe. (http://www.shorenewstoday.com/)

A weekly column dedicated to “digging out” current information about precious metals, coins and other numismatics.

A recent story in “The Numismatist,” a monthly publication put out by the American Numismatic Association, reminded me of a story about what is probably the most bizarre example of coin counterfeiting.

The counterfeiter, Francis Leroy Henning, a true underachiever, chose the lowly five-cent coin as the item he wished to make. And his intent was not to copy a rare coin that would have a greater numismatic value, but rather one that he would spend as five cents. Why he chose that coin instead of one with a higher denomination is unknown, but in all likelihood, because the higher-denomination coins were made of silver, his investment would be higher if he needed silver to make those coins.

Henning, who lived in Erial, N.J., made dies for five-cent coins with six different dates (1939, 1944, 1946, 1947 and 1953, with a sixth date that was never found) using a mechanical transfer process in his machine shop. He created a single reverse die, and where a mintmark would normally appear was blank, indicating a coin struck at the Philadelphia Mint. His operation took place in the years 1954 and 1955, and because he purportedly had a vending machine route, it was not unusual for him to make large deposits of coins in the bank.

His undoing came about as a result of his lack of knowledge of coins. As I said, the practice at the time was for all mints that struck coins to add a mintmark to the coin. However, coins struck at the Philadelphia Mint did not have any mintmark. The exception to this rule occurred during the war years of 1942-45, when a certain amount of the metals used to strike the five-cent coin were replaced with silver. These coins were so marked by adding a large mintmark on the reverse for each mint, now including the letter “P” for Philadelphia.

Since Mr. Henning used just one die for all his coins, the coin dated 1944 caused his endeavor to be exposed, since that coin didn’t have the required “P” mintmark.  Also, since all of his counterfeits were of the same metallic content as the regular five-cent coin, his 1944 coin didn’t contain the silver that a normal 1944 coin would, and hence had a different appearance.

Full article at the source>

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1974-D Aluminum Lincoln Cent on Display at Long Beach Expo

January 29, 2014 in Cents, Coins, Collecting, History, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Rare Coins, US Mint, USA Coins

January 28, 2014 By Coin Update (http://news.coinupdate.com/)

The first confirmed example of a 1974 Lincoln Cent struck in aluminum at the Denver Mint will be displayed by Heritage Auctions (www.HA.com) at the upcoming Long Beach Coin, Currency, Stamp & Sports Collectible Expo, held January 30 – February 1, 2014.  The coin will then will be offered as one of the highlights of the Heritage Signature Auction during the Central States Numismatic Society convention near Chicago, April 23 – 27, 2014.

“There’s been speculation about the existence of 1974-D aluminum cents for decades.  Now, there’s a confirmed coin, and a portion of the proceeds from its sale will be used by the sellers to help the homeless,” explained Todd Imhof, Executive Vice President of Heritage Auctions.

“This coin was previously owned by Harry Edmond Lawrence who served as Deputy Superintendent of the Denver Mint at the time it was struck 40 years ago, but its existence only recently came to light when his son brought it to a coin shop in Southern California. This is an amazing discovery, and we estimate the 1974-D aluminum cent will bring a quarter-million dollars or more,” said Imhof.

The coin has been authenticated and certified by Professional Coin Grading Service as MS63.

Full article and picture at the source>

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The one cent coin that’s worth a mint: Rare bronze penny from 1793 fetches $140,000 at auction

July 19, 2013 in Antique Coins, Auctions, Bronze, Bronze Coins, Cents, Coins, Collecting, History, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Rare Coins, USA Coins

  • Rare bronze coin dates from 1793 when the United States Mint opened
  • It created a frenzy at auction, reaching $140,000 from an anonymous bidder

By OLIVIA WILLIAMS (http://www.dailymail.co.uk)

A one-cent coin has sold at auction for $140,000 – 14 million times its original price.An international bidding war erupted for the rare bronze coin dating from 1793, the year the United States Mint first opened.The coin had been tipped to sell for around $4,560, but 10 keen bidders sent the price soaring at the Bonhams auction in London yesterday.

Eventually an anonymous coin collector placed the winning bid – at more than 30 times the estimate.

John Millenstead, head of coins and medals at Bonhams, said: ‘Although the coin is quite rare and in good condition, we are slightly bewildered that it went for quite so much.

Full article at source>

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