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A lesson in how not to compare grading services

July 9, 2017 in ANACS, Auctions, Blogs, Coin Errors, Coin Grading, Coins, Collecting, Education, Grading, Investing, Numismatica, Numismatics, Opinion, PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service), Rare Coins, USA Coins, World Coins

By: Scott Barman Coin Collectors Blog (CoinsBlog.ws)

Every so often I will read something and even though I agree with the premise and possibly the hypothesis, I disagree with the method. This is what happened when I read “How do late ANACS slabs stack up with modern PCGS?” This article by Michael Bugeja at Coin Update is not the first of its […] Full article at the source>

Source: Coin Collectors Blog (CoinsBlog.ws)

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Up to 63,000 Gold Eagles Accidentally Struck in High Relief

March 16, 2016 in Bullion, Coin Errors, Coins, Coins for sale, Collecting, Errors, Gold, Gold Bullion, Gold Coins, Gold Eagles, History, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Precious Metals, US Mint, USA Coins

By: Coin Update News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

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The U.S. Mint has conceded that as many as 63,000 one-ounce American Eagle gold bullion coins were accidentally struck with high relief obverses, according to Coin World. The Mint is investigating the circumstances that led to the abnormality, which causes the coins to scrape against one another when stacked, as the rims were struck to the appropriate dimensions.

Coin World learned of the development through an anonymous tip, and Tom Jurkowsky, director of the Mint’s Office of Corporate Communications, subsequently disclosed the 63,000-coin estimate.

Some bullion shipments containing the high relief Gold Eagles went out to the Mint’s authorized purchasers, as confirmed Full article at the source>

Source: News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

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Rare ‘mule’ dollar would be an exceptional find

June 25, 2015 in Antique Coins, Australian Coins, Blogs, Coin Errors, Coins, Collecting, Errors, History, Numismatica, Numismatics, Rare Coins, World Coins

By: Blog Team Perth Mint Blog

Mule2000Dollar

‘Mule’ is the numismatic term to describe a coin struck from dies not originally intended for use together. Australia’s most famous mule is a halfpenny struck in 1916. It is the rarest Commonwealth coin issued for circulation.

In 2000, a number of dollar coins were mistakenly struck using a 10 cents obverse (heads) die. The 10 cents is marginally smaller than the dollar, which meant the resulting mule had a heavier than normal rim on the obverse.

Mule obverse courtesy of Downies.

Error coin collectors soon drove prices up and a scramble to find the rogue pieces ensued, particularly… Full article at the source>

Source: Perth Mint Blog

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The silver-coloured 2p freak coin that was accidentally made in the wrong metal is set to sell for £1,000 at auction

July 26, 2014 in Auctions, Coin Errors, Coins, Collecting, Cupro-Nickel Coins, English Coins, Errors, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Rare Coins, The Royal Mint, World Coins

By MAIL ON SUNDAY REPORTER. 26 July 2014 (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/)

  • Coin was accidentally made in cupronickel rather than bronze 

  • Was discovered in 1988 by a petrol station owner opening roll of new coins 

  • Could fetch up to £1,000 at auction next week in Dorset  

A two pence piece that was accidentally made in the wrong metal is set to sell for 50,000 times its face value.

The coin was struck in cupronickel, the blend of copper and nickel formerly used for 10p and 5p coins, when it should have been bronze.

The errant coin, thought to be unique, was discovered in 1988, by the owner of a petrol station in a roll of new coins.

Full article and pictures at the source>

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PCGS Paris Grades Scarce 2014 £2 Britannia And Lunar “Mule” Varieties

March 14, 2014 in Bullion, Coin Errors, Coin Grading, Coins, Errors, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service), Press Releases, Silver, Silver Coins, The Royal Mint, UK Coins, World Coins

For immediate release 

March 13, 2014

News media contacts:

In Europe: Muriel Eymery, Phone: + 33 1 40 20 09 94

Email: MEymery@collectors.com

In the USA: Steve Sloan, Phone: (949) 567-1223

Email: SSloan@collectors.com

PCGS Paris Grades Scarce 2014  £Britannia And Lunar “Mule” Varieties

The £2 Britannia obverse design with denticles that was struck with the no-denticles reverse design intended for the Royal Mint's 2014 Year of the Horse Lunar New Year commemorative.  (Photo credit: Professional Coin Grading Service.)

The £2 Britannia obverse design with denticles that was struck with the no-denticles reverse design intended for the Royal Mint’s 2014 Year of the Horse Lunar New Year commemorative. (Photo credit: Professional Coin Grading Service.)

(Paris, France) — The Paris Submission Center of Professional Coin Grading Service (www.PCGSEurope.com) has authenticated, graded and certified its first examples of the two recently reported varieties of British 2014 silver £2 Britannia and Year of the Horse “mule” error coins.

The PCGS Glossary (www.pcgs.com/Lingo) defines a numismatic mule as “a rare mint error where the obverse die is of one coin and the reverse die is of another coin.”

One variety of the recent Royal Mint mules is the £2 Britannia obverse design with denticles that was struck with the no-denticles reverse design intended for the 2014 Year of the Horse Lunar New Year commemorative.  PCGS certified 461 of them during the recent PCGS Paris Grading Week, March 10 – 14, 2014.

The other variety is the no-denticles obverse of the Year of the Horse struck with the denticles reverse design intended for the £2 Britannia.  PCGS certified 22 of them in Paris.

Denticles are the tooth-like motif sometimes used as a design element around the inside rim of a coin.

The one-ounce, .999 fine silver bullion coins were submitted to PCGS by The London Coin Company of London, England in conjunction with the PCGS Paris Grading Week, March 10 – 14, 2014.

Ingram Liberman, President of The London Coin Company, said one of his customers first alerted him to the existence of the varieties.

The no-denticles obverse of the Royal Mint's Year of the Horse Lunar New Year commemorative struck with the denticles reverse design intended for the £2 Britannia.   (Photo credit: Professional Coin Grading Service.)

The no-denticles obverse of the Royal Mint’s Year of the Horse Lunar New Year commemorative struck with the denticles reverse design intended for the £2 Britannia. (Photo credit: Professional Coin Grading Service.)

“Back in late December 2013 or early January 2014 we had a call from one of our clients explaining he had purchased a 2014 Britannia £2 silver one-ounce coin and he wanted to return it.  He said it did not look like the picture of the coin he had purchased, and he thought the coin was a fake.”

After Liberman discussed the appearance of the coin with the client “the buyer quickly realized that, in fact, he had bought a £2 Britannia mule from us and wanted to hold onto it and to his collection.  He appreciated our honesty and integrity,Liberman explained.

“We chose PCGS to certify our coins because they are the strictest and most accurate authentication and grading company in the world with an internationally recognized reputation.  PCGS certification for coins is like GIA certification for diamonds: the leader in the industry,” stated Liberman, a PCGS Authorized Dealer.

“It’s always exciting to see a new coin variety in person for the first time, and these beautiful coins did not disappoint. These types of errors are highly sought after by collectors and already are bringing extremely steep prices.  They are true British numismatic pieces of history,” said Muriel Eymery, PCGS Vice President of International Business Development.

The Royal Mint is not describing them as errors, but rather as “a variation in the design for a limited time only.”  The Mint estimates that approximately 17,000 Britannia coins were struck with an obverse intended for the 2014 Year of the Horse, and about 38,000 Year of the Horse £2 silver coins were struck with the Britannia £2 obverse.

The PCGS Paris Submission Center office is open Monday to Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.  Appointments must be made in advance by calling +33(0) 1 40 20 09 94.

For additional information about PCGS services in Europe go to www.PCGSEurope.com.

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The Gold and Silver Mine – A South Jersey counterfeiter who aimed low

February 4, 2014 in Cents, Coin Errors, Coins, Counterfeit, Education, Fake Coins, Nickel Coins, Numismatic Crimes, Numismatica, Numismatics, USA Coins

By: Douglas Keefe. (http://www.shorenewstoday.com/)

A weekly column dedicated to “digging out” current information about precious metals, coins and other numismatics.

A recent story in “The Numismatist,” a monthly publication put out by the American Numismatic Association, reminded me of a story about what is probably the most bizarre example of coin counterfeiting.

The counterfeiter, Francis Leroy Henning, a true underachiever, chose the lowly five-cent coin as the item he wished to make. And his intent was not to copy a rare coin that would have a greater numismatic value, but rather one that he would spend as five cents. Why he chose that coin instead of one with a higher denomination is unknown, but in all likelihood, because the higher-denomination coins were made of silver, his investment would be higher if he needed silver to make those coins.

Henning, who lived in Erial, N.J., made dies for five-cent coins with six different dates (1939, 1944, 1946, 1947 and 1953, with a sixth date that was never found) using a mechanical transfer process in his machine shop. He created a single reverse die, and where a mintmark would normally appear was blank, indicating a coin struck at the Philadelphia Mint. His operation took place in the years 1954 and 1955, and because he purportedly had a vending machine route, it was not unusual for him to make large deposits of coins in the bank.

His undoing came about as a result of his lack of knowledge of coins. As I said, the practice at the time was for all mints that struck coins to add a mintmark to the coin. However, coins struck at the Philadelphia Mint did not have any mintmark. The exception to this rule occurred during the war years of 1942-45, when a certain amount of the metals used to strike the five-cent coin were replaced with silver. These coins were so marked by adding a large mintmark on the reverse for each mint, now including the letter “P” for Philadelphia.

Since Mr. Henning used just one die for all his coins, the coin dated 1944 caused his endeavor to be exposed, since that coin didn’t have the required “P” mintmark.  Also, since all of his counterfeits were of the same metallic content as the regular five-cent coin, his 1944 coin didn’t contain the silver that a normal 1944 coin would, and hence had a different appearance.

Full article at the source>

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Strike It Rich With Coins!

October 31, 2013 in Antique Coins, Coin Errors, Coins, Collecting, Dimes, Education, Nickel Coins, Numismatica, Numismatics, Pennies, Rare Coins, US Mint, USA Coins

By James Bucki October 25, 2013 (coins.about.com)

Did you ever pay $100 for candy bar? Or leave over $125,000 in the “Leave a Penny – Take a Penny” cup next to the cash register? If you don’t have this book you may have done exactly that. The United States Mint makes billions of coins every year. Odds have it, they are bound to make some mistakes and some of those mistakes will escape into general circulation. If you know what to look for, you can start pulling out error coins from your everyday pocket change. You never know, some of them may be worth big money!

Full article at source>

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Errors and Varieties You Can Find in Modern US Mint Numismatic Products

August 30, 2013 in Coin Errors, Coins, Education, Numismatica, Numismatics, US Mint, USA Coins

by Mint News Blog. August 23, 2013 (http://mintnewsblog.com)

Although the occurrence has been infrequent, over the years there have been some instances where errors or varieties have been packaged in modern United States Mint numismatic products. The next time you have a chance, you might want to check to see if you have any of these rare and in some cases extremely valuable coins residing unbeknownst in your collection. Each of the coins are easily identified, but at the same time can be easily overlooked.

United States coins are typically produced so that when turned vertically (top to bottom) the design will display its correct upright orientation. This is referred to as coin alignment. United States medals and some foreign coins are produced so that when turned horizontally (side to side) the design will display its upright orientation. This is referred to as medal alignment. A rotated die or rotated reverse error occurs when dies are installed incorrectly or a loose dies rotates so that coins are struck with the incorrect alignment.

Full article at source>

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Central Bank coins the wrong phrase

April 12, 2013 in Coin Errors, Coins, Collecting, Commemorative, Euro Coins, Irish Coins, Numismatica, Numismatics, Precious Metals, Proof Coins, Silver, Silver Coins

11/04/2013 (BreakingNews.ie)

There will be a few red faces in the Central Bank today.

They have brought out a silver commemorative coin honouring James Joyce which has an embarrassing mistake on it.
The €10 coin, which is on sale for €46 at the minute (go figure!), has a portrait of Joyce with a misquoted line from his lengthy tome Ulysses.

We’re sure you all know it….

No? Well here it is: “Ineluctable modality of the visible: at least that if no more, thought through my eyes. Signatures of all things I am here to read.”

They are from the third chapter as Stephen Dedalus has a bit of a think on Sandymount Strand.

The Central Bank coin has an extra “that” in the second sentence.

Full Article>

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