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Must-See Rarities at Denver World’s Fair of Money

June 21, 2017 in ANA (American Numismatic Association), Antique Coins, Clubs and Associations, Coin Shows, Coins, Collecting, Education, Entertainment, Errors, Fun, Gold, Gold Coins, History, Investing, Money, Museums, News, Numismatic Societies and Clubs, Numismatica, Numismatics, Press Releases, Rare Coins, Seminars, Treasure, USA Coins, World Coins

CONTACT: Donn Pearlman
Telephone: 702-868-5777

E-mail: donn.pearlman@gmail.com

Must-See Rarities at Denver World’s Fair of Money

 

To celebrate the American Numismatic Association’s (www.money.org) 50th anniversary in Colorado, the ANA is exhibiting Colorado Gold Rush era rarities and Lesher Referendum dollars along with other historic and famous numismatic treasures from the association’s Edward C. Rochette Money Museum at the World’s Fair of Money® (www.WorldsFairofMoney.com), August 1 – 5, 2017, at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver.

"During the early 1860's Colorado Gold Rush, Clark, Gruber & Co. of Denver produced gold coins including this 1860-dated $20 denomination coin with a fanciful depiction of Pike’s Peak. It will be displayed at the ANA World’s Fair of Money, August 1 – 5, 2016, in Denver." Photo credit: American Numismatic Association Money Museum

"During the early 1860's Colorado Gold Rush, Clark, Gruber & Co. of Denver produced gold coins including this 1860-dated $20 denomination coin with a fanciful depiction of Pike’s Peak. It will be displayed at the ANA World’s Fair of Money, August 1 – 5, 2016, in Denver."
Photo credit: American Numismatic Association Money Museum

"Only five 1913-dated Liberty Head nickels are known to exist today, and one of them will be displayed at the ANA Denver World’s Fair of Money, August 1 – 5, 2017. It is insured for $3 million." Photo credit: American Numismatic Association Money Museum

"Only five 1913-dated Liberty Head nickels are known to exist today, and one of them will be displayed at the ANA Denver World’s Fair of Money, August 1 – 5, 2017. It is insured for $3 million."
Photo credit: American Numismatic Association Money Museum

"The U.S. Treasury Department Bureau of Engraving and Printing will display its educational $1 Billion Exhibit featuring high denomination currency, including $100,000 notes, at the ANA World’s Fair of Money in Denver, August 1 – 5, 2017." Photo credit: Donn Pearlman

"The U.S. Treasury Department Bureau of Engraving and Printing will display its educational $1 Billion Exhibit featuring high denomination currency, including $100,000 notes, at the ANA World’s Fair of Money in Denver, August 1 – 5, 2017."
Photo credit: Donn Pearlman

"The U.S. Treasury Department Bureau of Engraving and Printing will display its educational $1 Billion Exhibit featuring high denomination currency, including $100,000 notes, at the ANA World’s Fair of Money in Denver, August 1 – 5, 2017." Photo credit: Donn Pearlman

"The U.S. Treasury Department Bureau of Engraving and Printing will display its educational $1 Billion Exhibit featuring high denomination currency, including $100,000 notes, at the ANA World’s Fair of Money in Denver, August 1 – 5, 2017."
Photo credit: Donn Pearlman

"One of the exhibits at the ANA World’s Fair of Money in Denver, August 1 – 5, 2017, features “funny money,” currency that was mistakenly misprinted, including this $1 bill with upside down serial numbers." Photo credit: American Numismatic Association Money Museum

"One of the exhibits at the ANA World’s Fair of Money in Denver, August 1 – 5, 2017, features “funny money,” currency that was mistakenly misprinted, including this $1 bill with upside down serial numbers."
Photo credit: American Numismatic Association Money Museum

Highlights include:

  • the McDermott/Bebee Collection 1913 Liberty Head nickel, Idler/Bebee Class III 1804 Draped Bust dollar and error notes from the Bebee collection with upside down serial numbers and other printing mistakes;
  • the High Relief and Ultra High Relief 1907 Saint-Gaudens Double Eagles from the Harry W. Bass, Jr. collection;
  • a set of 1860’s Clark, Gruber & Co. Colorado territorial gold pieces;
  • a nearly complete set Lesher Referendum silver dollars from the early 1900s;
  • a 1933 Eagle, one of the greatest gold coin rarities of the 20th century with less than 40 known surviving examples from the last year that U.S. gold coins were struck for circulation;
  • and the Rittenhouse 1792 Half Disme along with the George Washington-signed document appointing David Rittenhouse as first Director of the United States Mint.

The Museum Showcase area (booth #1103) will be open during public hours of the convention in Hall F of the Colorado Convention Center, 700 14th Street.

“The ANA opened its Colorado Springs headquarters building in 1967, and as part of this year’s golden anniversary we want collectors and the public to see examples of Colorado’s colorful numismatic history as well as some of the other most popular items in the ANA museum collection,” explained ANA Executive Director Kim Kiick.

“We’ve been planning for many months to create Denver convention exhibits that will be must-see for collectors and will be an educational and appealing introduction to the fascinating hobby for the general public,” said ANA Museum Curator Douglas Mudd.

“The 1913 Liberty Head nickel donated to the ANA by Aubrey and Adelle Bebee is always a favorite at the conventions. One of its previous owners, J.V. McDermott of Milwaukee, used to carry it in his pocket to show to strangers. Today it’s insured for $3 million and is one of only five known 1913 Liberty nickels,” said Mudd.

The Colorado Gold Rush era coins in the Museum Showcase will include an 1860 Clark, Gruber $20 gold piece with a design that has the word, DENVER, below a fanciful depiction of Pike’s Peak which actually is located in the Colorado Springs area, about 70 miles south.

Lesher Referendum dollars are an intriguing part of Colorado’s mining history.

“To promote greater use of silver, Joseph Lesher of Victor, Colorado created eight-sided ‘dollars’ in 1900 and 1901 from silver mined in the Cripple Creek area. Lesher quickly gave up his plans for the coins, but today these octagonal, so-called dollars are an example of Old West history you can hold in your hands,” explained Mudd.

The Rittenhouse 1792 Half Disme is an example of the first coins authorized by President Washington during the early days of the U.S. Mint.  It is being displayed by the ANA, courtesy of Brian Hendelson, President of Classic Coin Company, in celebration of the Mint’s 225th anniversary this year.

The Denver World’s Fair of Money will be open to the public Tuesday to Saturday, August 1 – 5. Public hours will be Tuesday, 1 – 5:30 pm; Wednesday – Friday, 10 am – 5:30 pm; and Saturday, 10 am – 4 pm.

Admission is free for all ANA members.  Admission for non-ANA members is $8 for adults, with children 12 and under admitted free.  Admission is for everyone on Saturday, August 5.

For additional information about the Denver World’s Fair of Money, visit www.WorldsFairofMoney.com or call 719-632-2646.

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Up to 63,000 Gold Eagles Accidentally Struck in High Relief

March 16, 2016 in Bullion, Coin Errors, Coins, Coins for sale, Collecting, Errors, Gold, Gold Bullion, Gold Coins, Gold Eagles, History, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Precious Metals, US Mint, USA Coins

By: Coin Update News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

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The U.S. Mint has conceded that as many as 63,000 one-ounce American Eagle gold bullion coins were accidentally struck with high relief obverses, according to Coin World. The Mint is investigating the circumstances that led to the abnormality, which causes the coins to scrape against one another when stacked, as the rims were struck to the appropriate dimensions.

Coin World learned of the development through an anonymous tip, and Tom Jurkowsky, director of the Mint’s Office of Corporate Communications, subsequently disclosed the 63,000-coin estimate.

Some bullion shipments containing the high relief Gold Eagles went out to the Mint’s authorized purchasers, as confirmed Full article at the source>

Source: News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

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U.S. Mint Explains ATB Proof Set Error, Drops Prices for Sets With Presidential Dollars

January 21, 2016 in Blogs, Coins, Coins for sale, Collecting, Collector Sets, Commemorative, Errors, New Releases, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Offers, Quarters, US Mint

By: Mint News Blog Mint News Blog (http://mintnewsblog.com)

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The 2016 America the Beautiful Quarters Proof Set went on sale on January 11, only to be pulled a short time later and given the uncertain release date of “To Be Determined.” Some sets were purchased and shipped before the interruption, but we don’t know how many as the item has not been included on this week’s U.S. Mint sales report. Now Tom Jurkowsky, Director of the Mint’s Office of Corporate Communications, has issued a statement explaining the decision to halt sales of the set:

The United States Mint has suspended sales of its 2016… Full article at the source>

Source: Mint News Blog (http://mintnewsblog.com)

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Leave it to the Experts

December 29, 2015 in Ancient Coins, Blogs, Coins, Collecting, Education, Errors, History, Numismatica, Numismatics, Opinion, Rare Coins, Silver, Silver Coins, World Coins

By: Wayne G. Sayles Ancient Coin Collecting (Wayne G. Sayles)

Where in the world does the press come up with their “experts” on cultural property matters? The latest brazen show of ignorance appears in a citation by “leading world museums and the U.N. Cultural agency” in a supposedly expert warning distributed through a plethora of media outlets by Associated Press.

 The photo caption above describes an Islamic gold dinar of the Marinid dynasty as one of the cultural treasures from Libya that needs to be watched for. Unfortunately, the image accompanying this caption is a silver tetradracm of Nikis, a magistrate of Cyrene… Full article at the source>

Source: Ancient Coin Collecting (Wayne G. Sayles)

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Rare ‘mule’ dollar would be an exceptional find

June 25, 2015 in Antique Coins, Australian Coins, Blogs, Coin Errors, Coins, Collecting, Errors, History, Numismatica, Numismatics, Rare Coins, World Coins

By: Blog Team Perth Mint Blog

Mule2000Dollar

‘Mule’ is the numismatic term to describe a coin struck from dies not originally intended for use together. Australia’s most famous mule is a halfpenny struck in 1916. It is the rarest Commonwealth coin issued for circulation.

In 2000, a number of dollar coins were mistakenly struck using a 10 cents obverse (heads) die. The 10 cents is marginally smaller than the dollar, which meant the resulting mule had a heavier than normal rim on the obverse.

Mule obverse courtesy of Downies.

Error coin collectors soon drove prices up and a scramble to find the rogue pieces ensued, particularly… Full article at the source>

Source: Perth Mint Blog

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The silver-coloured 2p freak coin that was accidentally made in the wrong metal is set to sell for £1,000 at auction

July 26, 2014 in Auctions, Coin Errors, Coins, Collecting, Cupro-Nickel Coins, English Coins, Errors, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Rare Coins, The Royal Mint, World Coins

By MAIL ON SUNDAY REPORTER. 26 July 2014 (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/)

  • Coin was accidentally made in cupronickel rather than bronze 

  • Was discovered in 1988 by a petrol station owner opening roll of new coins 

  • Could fetch up to £1,000 at auction next week in Dorset  

A two pence piece that was accidentally made in the wrong metal is set to sell for 50,000 times its face value.

The coin was struck in cupronickel, the blend of copper and nickel formerly used for 10p and 5p coins, when it should have been bronze.

The errant coin, thought to be unique, was discovered in 1988, by the owner of a petrol station in a roll of new coins.

Full article and pictures at the source>

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PCGS Paris Grades Scarce 2014 £2 Britannia And Lunar “Mule” Varieties

March 14, 2014 in Bullion, Coin Errors, Coin Grading, Coins, Errors, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, PCGS (Professional Coin Grading Service), Press Releases, Silver, Silver Coins, The Royal Mint, UK Coins, World Coins

For immediate release 

March 13, 2014

News media contacts:

In Europe: Muriel Eymery, Phone: + 33 1 40 20 09 94

Email: MEymery@collectors.com

In the USA: Steve Sloan, Phone: (949) 567-1223

Email: SSloan@collectors.com

PCGS Paris Grades Scarce 2014  £Britannia And Lunar “Mule” Varieties

The £2 Britannia obverse design with denticles that was struck with the no-denticles reverse design intended for the Royal Mint's 2014 Year of the Horse Lunar New Year commemorative.  (Photo credit: Professional Coin Grading Service.)

The £2 Britannia obverse design with denticles that was struck with the no-denticles reverse design intended for the Royal Mint’s 2014 Year of the Horse Lunar New Year commemorative. (Photo credit: Professional Coin Grading Service.)

(Paris, France) — The Paris Submission Center of Professional Coin Grading Service (www.PCGSEurope.com) has authenticated, graded and certified its first examples of the two recently reported varieties of British 2014 silver £2 Britannia and Year of the Horse “mule” error coins.

The PCGS Glossary (www.pcgs.com/Lingo) defines a numismatic mule as “a rare mint error where the obverse die is of one coin and the reverse die is of another coin.”

One variety of the recent Royal Mint mules is the £2 Britannia obverse design with denticles that was struck with the no-denticles reverse design intended for the 2014 Year of the Horse Lunar New Year commemorative.  PCGS certified 461 of them during the recent PCGS Paris Grading Week, March 10 – 14, 2014.

The other variety is the no-denticles obverse of the Year of the Horse struck with the denticles reverse design intended for the £2 Britannia.  PCGS certified 22 of them in Paris.

Denticles are the tooth-like motif sometimes used as a design element around the inside rim of a coin.

The one-ounce, .999 fine silver bullion coins were submitted to PCGS by The London Coin Company of London, England in conjunction with the PCGS Paris Grading Week, March 10 – 14, 2014.

Ingram Liberman, President of The London Coin Company, said one of his customers first alerted him to the existence of the varieties.

The no-denticles obverse of the Royal Mint's Year of the Horse Lunar New Year commemorative struck with the denticles reverse design intended for the £2 Britannia.   (Photo credit: Professional Coin Grading Service.)

The no-denticles obverse of the Royal Mint’s Year of the Horse Lunar New Year commemorative struck with the denticles reverse design intended for the £2 Britannia. (Photo credit: Professional Coin Grading Service.)

“Back in late December 2013 or early January 2014 we had a call from one of our clients explaining he had purchased a 2014 Britannia £2 silver one-ounce coin and he wanted to return it.  He said it did not look like the picture of the coin he had purchased, and he thought the coin was a fake.”

After Liberman discussed the appearance of the coin with the client “the buyer quickly realized that, in fact, he had bought a £2 Britannia mule from us and wanted to hold onto it and to his collection.  He appreciated our honesty and integrity,Liberman explained.

“We chose PCGS to certify our coins because they are the strictest and most accurate authentication and grading company in the world with an internationally recognized reputation.  PCGS certification for coins is like GIA certification for diamonds: the leader in the industry,” stated Liberman, a PCGS Authorized Dealer.

“It’s always exciting to see a new coin variety in person for the first time, and these beautiful coins did not disappoint. These types of errors are highly sought after by collectors and already are bringing extremely steep prices.  They are true British numismatic pieces of history,” said Muriel Eymery, PCGS Vice President of International Business Development.

The Royal Mint is not describing them as errors, but rather as “a variation in the design for a limited time only.”  The Mint estimates that approximately 17,000 Britannia coins were struck with an obverse intended for the 2014 Year of the Horse, and about 38,000 Year of the Horse £2 silver coins were struck with the Britannia £2 obverse.

The PCGS Paris Submission Center office is open Monday to Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.  Appointments must be made in advance by calling +33(0) 1 40 20 09 94.

For additional information about PCGS services in Europe go to www.PCGSEurope.com.

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Vatican coins recalled for misspelling ‘Jesus’

October 13, 2013 in Commemorative, Errors, Medals, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Vatican

Holy oversight!

The Vatican recalled more than 6,000 commemorative medals this week after discovering the word ”Jesus” was misspelled as “Lesus” on the coins, according to a report in the German news site Spiegel International.

Full article at source>

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