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Ukraine: 100th anniversary of first statehood celebrated with new coin

March 29, 2017 in Coins, Collecting, Commemorative, Education, History, New Releases, News, Nickel Coins, Numismatica, Numismatics, World Coins

By: Michael Alexander News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

The National Bank of Ukraine have issued (22nd March) a new coin in celebration of Ukraine’s first declaration of statehood, which occurred in the wake of the dissolution of the Russian Empire in 1917. Events surrounding the abdication of Czar Nicholas II on the 15th March 1917 resulted in the initial declaration of independence in the spring of 1917, but this declaration would be followed by a civil conflict and a short-lived duration of statehood.

The coin is produced by the Ukrainian… Full article at the source>

 

Source: News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

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High-End Sets Usually a Bargain — This One Was Stunning

November 4, 2016 in Auctions, Coin Grading, Coins, Collecting, Collector Sets, Education, Fun, Grading, History, News, Nickel Coins, Numismatica, Numismatics, Opinion, USA Coins

By: Michael Bugeja News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)

nickel

As you can see, I won this Jefferson nickel set in a Capitol Coin Auction on Proxibid. The set was described as special, and because I trusted auctioneer Brad Lisembee’s numismatic skills, I bid $300, with the set coming in a hundred less than my maximum.

I was not disappointed. Nearly every nickel was gem, as he stated, although some were duplicates of the same date put in a spare slot in the Dansco album. For instance, there was no 1938. A 1938-D was placed there instead.

This article explains how to dismantle a set of coins. First, you want to identify… Full article at the source>

Source: News.CoinUpdate.com (Coin Update News)




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World War One pre-decimal coin pack – available now

December 16, 2014 in Australian Coins, Blogs, Coins, Coins for sale, Collecting, Collector Sets, Commemorative, Copper Coins, History, News, Nickel Coins, Numismatica, Numismatics, Perth Mint, Precious Metals, Silver Coins, World Coins

By Blog Team Perth Mint Blog

WWI_Coin-pack

The launch of the Commonwealth’s own silver coins in 1910 and first bronze coins in 1911 were key events in the history of modern Australia.

A few years after their introduction, the young nation faced its biggest challenge to that point – a world war of unimaginable carnage and horror.

Drawing together these important themes, this superb pre-decimal coin pack offers collectors an example of all six Commonwealth coins featuring year-dates between the fateful years of 1914 Full article at the source>

Source: Perth Mint Blog

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Historic Bass Collection Patterns Offered By Heritage Auctions At ANA World’s Fair of Money

June 2, 2014 in ANA (American Numismatic Association), Antique Coins, Auctions, Bronze Coins, Charity, Coin Grading, Coins, Coins for sale, Collecting, Copper, Copper Coins, Events, NGC (Numismatic Guaranty Corporation ), Nickel Coins, Numismatic Societies and Clubs, Numismatica, Numismatics, Press Releases, Rare Coins, Silver, Silver Coins, USA Coins

For immediate release
June 2, 2014

News media contact:
Noah Fleisher, (214) 409-1143  NoahF@ha.com

Historic Bass Collection Patterns Offered By Heritage Auctions At ANA World’s Fair of Money

 

Proceeds from August 7, 2014 auction of these 30 coins will aid philanthropic mission of Harry W. Bass, Jr. Foundation

 

(Dallas, Texas) — Thirty United States pattern coins from the acclaimed collection of the late Texas business executive and philanthropist Harry W. Bass Jr. (1927 – 1998) will be offered without reserves during the Platinum Night auction conducted by Heritage Auctions (http://www.ha.com) on August 7th, 2014 during the Chicago 2014 American Numismatic Association World’s Fair of MoneySM.  Proceeds from the sale will be used for philanthropic purposes by the Harry W. Bass Jr. Foundation of Dallas.

The Bass Collection 1838 plain edge Seated Liberty half dollar pattern in copper (Judd-77) will be offered without reserve by Heritage Auctions at the 2014 ANA World's Fair of Money. (Photo credit: Images from Heritage Auctions with permission from the Harry W. Bass Jr. Foundation.)

The Bass Collection 1838 plain edge Seated Liberty half dollar pattern in copper (Judd-77) will be offered without reserve by Heritage Auctions at the 2014 ANA World's Fair of Money. (Photo credit: Images from Heritage Auctions with permission from the Harry W. Bass Jr. Foundation.)

The Bass Collection 1838 plain edge Seated Liberty half dollar pattern in copper (Judd-77) will be offered without reserve by Heritage Auctions at the 2014 ANA World's Fair of Money. (Photo credit: Images from Heritage Auctions with permission from the Harry W. Bass Jr. Foundation.)

The Bass Collection 1838 plain edge Seated Liberty half dollar pattern in copper (Judd-77) will be offered without reserve by Heritage Auctions at the 2014 ANA World's Fair of Money. (Photo credit: Images from Heritage Auctions with permission from the Harry W. Bass Jr. Foundation.)

An 1865 with motto Seated dollar n silver (Judd-434) is among the 30 Bass Collection pattern coins Heritage Auctions will offer without reserve at the 2014 ANA World's Fair of Money. (Photo credit: Images from Heritage Auctions with permission from the Harry W. Bass Jr. Foundation.)

An 1865 with motto Seated dollar n silver (Judd-434) is among the 30 Bass Collection pattern coins Heritage Auctions will offer without reserve at the 2014 ANA World's Fair of Money. (Photo credit: Images from Heritage Auctions with permission from the Harry W. Bass Jr. Foundation.)

An 1865 with motto Seated dollar n silver (Judd-434) is among the 30 Bass Collection pattern coins Heritage Auctions will offer without reserve at the 2014 ANA World's Fair of Money. (Photo credit: Images from Heritage Auctions with permission from the Harry W. Bass Jr. Foundation.)

An 1865 with motto Seated dollar n silver (Judd-434) is among the 30 Bass Collection pattern coins Heritage Auctions will offer without reserve at the 2014 ANA World's Fair of Money. (Photo credit: Images from Heritage Auctions with permission from the Harry W. Bass Jr. Foundation.)

For the past 14 years, the 30 historic patterns have been on loan to the ANA and were frequently displayed in rotation with hundreds of other Bass Collection coins at the association’s Edward C. Rochette Money Museum at ANA headquarters in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

The coins in the upcoming auction include an 1838 plain edge Liberty Seated half dollar in copper (Judd-77), an 1865 with motto Seated Dollar in silver (J-434) and an 1875 Trade dollar in silver (J-1426).  All of the consigned Bass coins are being submitted to Numismatic Guaranty Corporation for grading and will have the pedigree on the insert labels in the holders.

Coins from the Bass Collection of patterns to be offered without reserve by Heritage Auctions at the 2014 ANA World's Fair of Money include this 1875 Trade dollar in silver (Judd-1426). (Photo credit: Images from Heritage Auctions with permission from the Harry W. Bass Jr. Foundation.)

Coins from the Bass Collection of patterns to be offered without reserve by Heritage Auctions at the 2014 ANA World's Fair of Money include this 1875 Trade dollar in silver (Judd-1426). (Photo credit: Images from Heritage Auctions with permission from the Harry W. Bass Jr. Foundation.)

Coins from the Bass Collection of patterns to be offered without reserve by Heritage Auctions at the 2014 ANA World's Fair of Money include this 1875 Trade dollar in silver (Judd-1426). (Photo credit: Images from Heritage Auctions with permission from the Harry W. Bass Jr. Foundation.)

Coins from the Bass Collection of patterns to be offered without reserve by Heritage Auctions at the 2014 ANA World's Fair of Money include this 1875 Trade dollar in silver (Judd-1426). (Photo credit: Images from Heritage Auctions with permission from the Harry W. Bass Jr. Foundation.)

“These literally are museum-quality rare coins!,” said Todd Imhof, Executive Vice President of Heritage Auctions, an official auctioneer of the 2014 ANA World’s Fair of Money.

“These amazing patterns come to the Chicago auction out of the specialized holdings of the Bass Collection that has been on display at the ANA Museum since 2000 when the ANA was selected by the Harry W. Bass, Jr. Foundation to hold this incredible collection,” explained Imhof.

F. David Calhoun, Executive Director of the Harry W. Bass, Jr. Foundation stated: “Over the years, Harry Bass worked with various experts at Heritage and made purchases with our Dallas neighbor, but never consigned through their auctions. Now, we are returning selections to the marketplace. As the Harry W. Bass, Jr. Foundation sells these coins to provide funds to support our philanthropic mission, we are seeking the highest possible return. I trust Heritage to provide that, and I look forward to working with them in this new capacity.”

Pattern coins were produced usually in small quantity to test proposed designs, and sometimes were struck in various metals.  U.S. patterns are often cited by their “J” number as part of the reference system originally created by researcher and patterns reference book author, Dr. J. Hewitt Judd.

In addition to J-77, 434 and 1426 mentioned above, the 27 other patterns from the Bass Collection that will be offered at the auction are:

  • 1838 Seated Liberty half dollar, J-79 original in silver
  • 1850 Annular Cent, J-119 in billon
  • 1855 Flying Eagle cent, J-168 in bronze
  • 1861 With Motto half dollar, J-278 in copper
  • 1863 Postage Currency dime, J-326 in copper
  • 1863 With Motto quarter dollar, J-335 in silver
  • 1863 With Motto half dollar, J-344 in aluminum
  • 1865 With Motto half dollar, J-429 in silver
  • 1866 Washington five cent, J-473 in nickel
  • 1866 Shield nickel, J-509 in bronze
  • 1868 cent, J-606 in copper
  • 1869 Standard Silver quarter dollar, J-721 in silver
  • 1870 half dime, J-815 in copper
  • 1871 Indian Princess quarter dollar, J-1090 in silver
  • 1871 Indian Princess quarter dollar, J-1092 in aluminum
  • 1871 Indian Princess quarter dollar, J-1093 in silver
  • 1871 Indian Princess dollar, J-1149 in aluminum
  • 1872 Commercial dollar, J-1219 in silver
  • 1873 Trade dollar, J-1293 in silver
  • 1873 Trade dollar, J-1322 in silver
  • 1874 Twenty cent piece, J-1355 in copper
  • 1874 Twenty cent piece, J-1356 in aluminum
  • 1879 quarter dollar, J-1591 in copper
  • 1881 cent, J-1665 in aluminum
  • 1882 Shield nickel, J-1697 in nickel
  • 1885 Snowden dollar, J-1747 in silver
  • 1896 five cents, J-1771 in nickel

“Harry W. Bass, Jr.’s collection has long been heralded as one of the most amazing collections ever put together, and we’ve been very fortunate to get to display these beautiful works of art at the Edward C. Rochette Money Museum,” said Kim Kiick, ANA Executive Director. “Thousands of visitors to the Money Museum have enjoyed the Bass Collection over the years, and thousands more will continue to enjoy the rest of Harry Bass’s amazing collection in the interactive Bass Gallery. We very much appreciate our long-term relationship and support that the Harry W. Bass Jr. Foundation has given to the ANA.”

Bass was a life member of the ANA for more than 30 years.  He received the ANA Medal of Merit in 1989, and was selected to the association’s Numismatic Hall of Fame in 1998.

The Harry W. Bass, Jr. Foundation seeks to enrich the lives of Texans by providing support to qualified organizations in the areas of education, human services, civic and community, science and research, and arts and culture. It funds special projects of public entities or other nonprofit 501(c)(3) endeavors. Mr. Bass sought to extend the accomplishments of his father’s Harry Bass Foundation, established by Harry Bass, Sr., supporting Dallas charitable and religious institutions, hospitals, and museums with funds from family oil interests and subsequent investments. Assets of the merged Harry W. Bass, Jr. Foundation have continued to grow with the sale of portions of Mr. Bass’s coin collection, following his death in April 1998. This auction will further that mission.

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $900 million, and 850,000+ online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

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The Gold and Silver Mine – A South Jersey counterfeiter who aimed low

February 4, 2014 in Cents, Coin Errors, Coins, Counterfeit, Education, Fake Coins, Nickel Coins, Numismatic Crimes, Numismatica, Numismatics, USA Coins

By: Douglas Keefe. (http://www.shorenewstoday.com/)

A weekly column dedicated to “digging out” current information about precious metals, coins and other numismatics.

A recent story in “The Numismatist,” a monthly publication put out by the American Numismatic Association, reminded me of a story about what is probably the most bizarre example of coin counterfeiting.

The counterfeiter, Francis Leroy Henning, a true underachiever, chose the lowly five-cent coin as the item he wished to make. And his intent was not to copy a rare coin that would have a greater numismatic value, but rather one that he would spend as five cents. Why he chose that coin instead of one with a higher denomination is unknown, but in all likelihood, because the higher-denomination coins were made of silver, his investment would be higher if he needed silver to make those coins.

Henning, who lived in Erial, N.J., made dies for five-cent coins with six different dates (1939, 1944, 1946, 1947 and 1953, with a sixth date that was never found) using a mechanical transfer process in his machine shop. He created a single reverse die, and where a mintmark would normally appear was blank, indicating a coin struck at the Philadelphia Mint. His operation took place in the years 1954 and 1955, and because he purportedly had a vending machine route, it was not unusual for him to make large deposits of coins in the bank.

His undoing came about as a result of his lack of knowledge of coins. As I said, the practice at the time was for all mints that struck coins to add a mintmark to the coin. However, coins struck at the Philadelphia Mint did not have any mintmark. The exception to this rule occurred during the war years of 1942-45, when a certain amount of the metals used to strike the five-cent coin were replaced with silver. These coins were so marked by adding a large mintmark on the reverse for each mint, now including the letter “P” for Philadelphia.

Since Mr. Henning used just one die for all his coins, the coin dated 1944 caused his endeavor to be exposed, since that coin didn’t have the required “P” mintmark.  Also, since all of his counterfeits were of the same metallic content as the regular five-cent coin, his 1944 coin didn’t contain the silver that a normal 1944 coin would, and hence had a different appearance.

Full article at the source>

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Brazil Issues Numismatic Series for World Cup Soccer

February 2, 2014 in Brazil Coins, Coins, Collecting, Commemorative, Copper Coins, Gold Coins, News, Nickel Coins, Numismatica, Numismatics, Press Releases, Silver Coins

Brasilia, Jan 29 (Prensa Latina) The Brazilian Central Bank unveiled a series of commemorative coins today to mark the 2014 World Cup, scheduled from June 12 to July 13.

The limited numismatic series consists of a gold coin, two silver and six of copper and nickel, which can be acquired by fans at the headquarters of the issuing bank in Brazil.

A gold piece of 16 mm in diameter, with nominal value of 10 reais (about four dollars) appears as the most exclusive, with 5,000 units to be sold at a price of 1,180 reais (491 dollars).

On the face of it is the championship trophy and the inscription “World Cup FIFA Brazil-2014.”

The reverse shows a soccer ball touching the net and the four stars of the Southern Cross constellation, the country�s national symbol.

In silver, coins 40 mm in diameter were minted, with a nominal value of five reais (two dollars) and maximum runs of 20,000 units, priced at 190 reais (79 dollars) apiece.

There are two 5 reais coins. One of them has on one side the mascot of the World Cup, Fuleco, and the reverse shows the Maracana stadium in Rio de Janeiro, venue for the final game; while the another shows a player who kicks the ball, himself seemingly in mid-air, and on the reverse a map of Brazil with the name of the twelve sites with monuments, cultural elements, animals or trees characteristic of each.

The cheapest copper-nickel coin consists of six coins of two reais (0.8 dollars) that will be sold at 30 reais (12.5 dollars), which represent different plays such as goalkeeper save, chest control, header, passing, dribbling and goal definition.

sus/sa/cgm/mgt/ogt

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Travel Channel Features “Million-Dollar Nickel”

January 30, 2014 in Coins, Collecting, Nickel Coins, Numismatica, Numismatics, Rare Coins, US Mint, USA Coins

By James Bucki January 20, 2014 (http://coins.about.com)

One of the things that I love most about coin collecting is that it is driven by history. Not only do coins reflect the history of the nation, but the particular history of an individual coin can also be fascinating. Just recently the 1913 Liberty Head nickel sold for approximately $3.3 million. There are only five known genuine examples of this nickel but yet nobody knows for certain how they came into being. The Travel Channel recently ran a short segment on these nickels highlighting some of their fascinating history and how little is known about them. The Travel Channel series “Mysteries at the Museum” spent a full day at the ANA’s Money Museum in October of 2013, shooting footage and interviewing Money Museum Curator Douglas Mudd.

Full article at the source>

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Hawaii Five-O 1913 Liberty Nickel Realizes $3,290,000

January 10, 2014 in Antique Coins, Auctions, Coin Shows, Coins, Collecting, Nickel Coins, Numismatica, Numismatics, Rare Coins, USA Coins

January 9, 2014 By Dennis Hengeveld (http://news.coinupdate.com)

The 2014 Florida United Numismatists Convention held in Orlando, Florida included an auction conducted by Heritage Auctions. While almost every type of United States coinage was offered at the auction there were a number of single coins that led the sale. One of these, no doubt, was the Olsen specimen of the 1913 Liberty Nickel. Graded PF-64 by NGC and considered to be second finest of just five specimens known to have been struck and known to exist, the coin realized a final price of $3,290,000 including buyer’s premium. The coin, which is famous for appearing in a 1973 episode of the series “Hawaii-Five-O” had last sold at public auction in January of 2010, when it realized $3,737,500.

1913 Liberty Head Nickel, PR64 King of 20th Century Coins

1913 Liberty Head Nickel, PR64
King of 20th Century Coins

1913 Liberty Head Nickel, PR64 King of 20th Century Coins

1913 Liberty Head Nickel, PR64
King of 20th Century Coins

The attentive reader will realize that we have featured a number of articles on the 1913 Liberty Nickel over the years. One of these articles was on the occasion of the sale of the Walton Specimen, sold in April of last year. And even though the sale of the Olsen specimen is the second example available to collectors at public auction within a year, this does not mean that such offerings have traditionally been common. In fact, prior to these two auction sales there had just been a dozen auctions in which a 1913 Liberty Nickel had appeared for sale, the first in 1944 when the coin sold by Heritage this year realized $3,750 when B Max Mehl sold it as part of the Olsen Collection.

Full article at the source>

Link to Heritage Auctions Auction Archive Page for this coin

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Trio Of Famous U.S. Numismatic Rarities Anchor Heritage Auctions’ FUN Offerings, January 8-12

December 21, 2013 in Antique Coins, Auctions, Clubs and Associations, Coin Shows, Coins, Coins for sale, Collecting, Commemorative, Gold, Gold Coins, News, Nickel Coins, Numismatic Societies and Clubs, Numismatica, Numismatics, Press Releases, Rare Coins, Silver, Silver Coins, USA Coins

Press Release – December 18, 2013 (Heritage Auctios http://www.HA.com)

1787 Brasher doubloon, 1913 Liberty Nickel (Olsen specimen) and a 1927-D Double Eagle top the list of important offerings in Orlando, FL, Jan. 8-12, in the Official Auction of the Florida United Numismatists (FUN) Annual Convention

1787 DBLN Brasher Doubloon, EB on Wing, W-5840, MS63 NGC. CAC....

1787 DBLN Brasher Doubloon, EB on Wing, W-5840, MS63 NGC. CAC….

DALLAS — An astounding trinity of legendary American numismatic rarities — a 1787 Brasher doubloon with hallmark EB on the eagle’s wing, MS63 NGC, CAC, a 1913 Liberty nickel, PR64 NGC, CAC, the Olsen Specimen and a 1927-D double eagle, MS66 NGC — expected to bring millions of dollars when they cross the auction block as part of Heritage’s January 8-12 Florida United Numismatists (FUN) U.S. Coin Signature Auction Platinum Night offerings, have the world of high-end coin collecting abuzz.

“The sheer variety in this Platinum Night is amazing,” said Greg Rohan, President of Heritage. “The Brasher, the 1913 Liberty nickel and the 1927-D double eagle are only the tip of the proverbial iceberg here.”

The first to sell will be a 1787 Brasher doubloon with hallmark EB on the eagle’s wing, MS63 NGC, CAC. This Brasher doubloon was the first one known to numismatists and has been off the market since Walter Perschke purchased it in 1979.

“The Brasher doubloons, created by New York silversmith Ephraim Brasher, were the first truly American gold coins, struck by a resident of a former British colony for use within the United States,” said Rohan. “The most famous are those with Brasher’s original design, which adapts New York’s state coat of arms on one side and the Great Seal of the United States on the other.”

Soon after, a 1913 Liberty nickel, PR64 NGC, CAC, the Olsen Specimen, will cross the auction block. One of only five 1913 Liberty nickels known, two of which are held by museums, it also is called “The Hawaii Five-O Specimen” after an appearance on a 1973 episode of the television show. It is offered as part of The Greensboro Collection, Part V.

“Between the fame the 1913 Liberty nickel has among coin collectors and the Olsen Specimen’s TV appearance, it is one of the most famous single coins on Earth,” said Rohan. “It’s a numismatic star that will lend instant prestige to its new owner.”

1927-D double eagle, MS66 NGC, is the crown jewel of The Douglas Martin Collection, a virtually complete set of $20 gold pieces. After Franklin Delano Roosevelt issued an executive order that prohibited almost all ownership of gold coins, the Treasury Department stopped paying out gold and eventually destroyed the coins it had on hand, including almost all the 1927-D double eagles ever struck. Out of 13 examples traced, four are held by museums and unavailable to collectors. The Saint-Gaudens double eagles are among the most beautiful and popular U.S. coins, and owning a 1927-D is a mark of distinction.

Two important silver coins that would headline almost any other auction certainly deserve special mention: an 1870-S Seated dollar, XF40 PCGS, is one of only nine confirmed examples and is a centerpiece of The Usibelli Collection, themed around the year 1870, one of the most challenging in U.S. numismatics, while an 1884 Trade dollar, PR65 PCGS, CAC, is one of only 10 struck under mysterious circumstances. It comes from The Smoke Rise Collection.

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

1861 Confederate States of America cent, PR63 PCGS Secure: Made by a Philadelphia engraver, Robert Lovett, Jr., who soon had second thoughts about making coins for the Confederacy. From The Noble Family Collection.

1792 half disme, Judd-7 variety, MS65 PCGS: One of the best-preserved examples of the first federally issued silver coins, mentioned in a speech by President George Washington to Congress. From The Klamath Mountain Collection, Part II.

1879 Coiled Hair Stella in gold, Judd-1638 variety, PR66 Cameo PCGS Secure: With the unusual face value of four dollars and one of only 12 specimens definitively traced.

1826 half eagle, BD-2 variety, MS66 PCGS: One of only three examples known for the variety and easily the finest, a landmark offering for early gold coinage specialists. From The David & Sharron Akers Collection.

1827 half eagle, BD-1 variety, MS64 PCGS: A noted rarity struck from a single pair of dies, one of the better-preserved coins out of 17 confirmed examples. From the collection of Donald E. Bently, sold for the benefit of the Bently Foundation.

1838-O 50C PR64 NGC: The 1838-O Reeded Edge half dollar is one of the most mysterious and valuable coins in American numismatics. The 1838-O is believed to be the earliest branch mint proof coin of any denomination and no official record of its mintage exists. Researchers have traced only nine surviving examples in all grades, with one coin impounded in the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution, and two others in slightly impaired condition.

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Strike It Rich With Coins!

October 31, 2013 in Antique Coins, Coin Errors, Coins, Collecting, Dimes, Education, Nickel Coins, Numismatica, Numismatics, Pennies, Rare Coins, US Mint, USA Coins

By James Bucki October 25, 2013 (coins.about.com)

Did you ever pay $100 for candy bar? Or leave over $125,000 in the “Leave a Penny – Take a Penny” cup next to the cash register? If you don’t have this book you may have done exactly that. The United States Mint makes billions of coins every year. Odds have it, they are bound to make some mistakes and some of those mistakes will escape into general circulation. If you know what to look for, you can start pulling out error coins from your everyday pocket change. You never know, some of them may be worth big money!

Full article at source>

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Full Step Jefferson Nickels

October 14, 2013 in Coin Grading, Coins, Education, Nickel Coins, Numismatica, Numismatics, USA Coins

October 11, 2013 By Dennis Hengeveld  (http://news.coinupdate.com)

American numismatics is a highly developed collecting area that, especially compared to numismatics of other countries, is way ahead of its time. One area where this is very obvious is the “obsession” that American collectors have with grades. The 1-70 system developed by William Sheldon is uniquely American and only in the past few years has this system spread to other countries, often being received with resentment from old timers and frowned eye-brows (at best) by more open-minded collectors. Yet, American collectors (and grading companies) have gone even further, introducing such grading terms as “Full Bell Lines” and “Full Bands”, indicating the strike and overall quality of certain type of coins. One such designation is “Full Steps”, and in this article we will take a look at this unique designation used when grading Jefferson Nickels.

Full article at source>

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Coins Mark 10th Anniversary of the Last Flight of the Concorde

August 7, 2013 in Coins, Commemorative, News, Nickel Coins, Numismatica, Numismatics, Precious Metals, Proof Coins, Silver, Silver Coins, World Coins

August 6, 2013 By Michael Alexander (http://news.coinupdate.com)

Concorde on Bristol

Concorde On Bristol. By Arpingstone (Adrian Pingstone) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The Treasury of the British Virgin Islands have launched (2nd August) two exciting coins which mark the 10th anniversary of the last flight of the Concorde air shuttle service.

Regarded by many as an aviation icon and an engineering marvel, the supersonic passenger airliner known simply as “Concorde” made its final scheduled flight in October 2003. Jointly developed and produced by Aérospatiale and the British Aircraft Corporation (BAC) under an Anglo-French treaty, Concorde first entered service in 1976 and continued commercial flights for 27 years.  Flying regular transatlantic flights from either London Heathrow or Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport to New York JFK or Washington Dulles in the United States, this amazing aircraft could complete its journey in half the time of normal passenger airlines.  More than 2.5m passengers flew supersonically on British Airways Concorde flights.

On 10th April 2003, Air France and British Airways both announced that Concorde would be retired later that year and in October 2003 Concorde landed at Heathrow Airport for the very last time.  On this day, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II consented to the illumination of Windsor Castle to mark the occasion, an honor that is usually reserved for state events and visiting dignitaries, as the last westbound commercial flight left London.

Full Article at source>

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Legend Numismatics purchases famous 1894-S Daggett Specimen Dime

July 17, 2013 in Antique Coins, Coins, Collecting, Dimes, History, News, Nickel Coins, Numismatica, Numismatics, Press Releases, USA Coins

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE             Date of Release: July 16, 2013

Legend Numismatics purchases famous 1894-S Daggett Specimen Dime

LINCROFT, NJ – Legend Numismatics has purchased the famous 10C 1894-S PCGS BM PR64+ Daggett Specimen from David Lawrence Rare Coins for a sum in excess of $2 million, a record price for any dime.

While helping fulfill a collecting goal of Legend partner Bruce Morelan, the firm also believes classic rarities like this are still undervalued in today’s marketplace. “We have no problem stocking a classic rarity like this. A classic Mercedes racecar sold last week for nearly $29,000,000.00. Paintings regularly sell for $10-$30,000,000.00. So a classic major numismatic rarity like this is cheap. In all the years Legend has bought and sold great rarities like the 94-S 10C, none have ever gone down in value. This coin was a no brainer for us to buy,” said Laura Sperber, President of Legend Numismatics.

John Feigenbaum, President of David Lawrence Rare Coins, personally handled the transaction with Legend. According to Feigenbaum, “It was an easy negotiation and a pleasure because both parties believe in the rarity and extreme desirability of this historic coin. Laura and I have always treasured the 1894-S dime and it was logical to me that her firm would be a likely candidate to acquire this piece. I wish them great success with the coin.”

There are many theories as to why 24 proof Dimes were minted in 1894 at San Francisco. Only 10 are confirmed to exist today and this coin is likely the third finest known. The most widely accepted theory is that the Mint Superintendent, John Daggett, had high ranking visitors he wanted to impress with special coins. No one knows for sure why he picked the Dime, except that he needed to balance a $2.40 deficit in the Mint ledger, so striking 24 dimes achieved dual purposes. After minting and distribution to his friends and guests, he gave 3 or 4 coins to his daughter, Hallie Daggett.

This story is one of the greatest in numismatic lore, and continues when Daggett’s daughter Hallie eventually sold a couple gem examples, including this very coin, to Earl Parker, a coin dealer in California, around 1950. At the time, she told Parker that she originally spent one of her prized dimes to buy an ice cream cone. That coin is known today in Good-4 as the “Ice Cream Specimen” but has not traded hands publicly since 1981. 1894-S Dimes have long been considered one of the top major classic numismatic rarities, along with the 5C 1913 Liberty Nickel, and the 1804 $1. In fact, the coin is currently ranked #4 in the “100 Greatest U.S. Coins” (Third Edition, Garrett, 2008) — behind the 1913 nickel, but ahead of the 1804 dollar, in importance.

Legend Numismatics
P O Box 9
Lincroft, NJ  07738
732-935-1795
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A bad penny? New coins and nickel allergy

June 24, 2013 in British Coins, Coins, Health, Nickel Coins, UK Coins

By Anna Lacey BBC Health Check (http://www.bbc.co.uk)

Tests suggest people with a nickel allergy can be at increased risk when handling the UK’s new 5p and 10p coins.

The coins, introduced in January 2012, caused a complete shake-up in the world of small change.

Instead of the copper-nickel alloy that’s been weighing down our pockets since 1947, new 5p and 10p pieces will be made from steel and coated with a layer of nickel.

To the untrained eye, there’s very little difference. They’ve got the same silver shine and the same jangle.

But for the 10% of the population who suffer from a nickel allergy, they could feel very different indeed.

Concerned dermatologists wrote to the British Medical Journal after the coins were released to call for a proper assessment of the health risks.

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Falklands and Ascension coins to commemorate the life of Lady Thatcher

June 14, 2013 in British Coins, Coins, Commemorative, English Coins, Gold, Gold Coins, News, Nickel Coins, Numismatica, Numismatics, Precious Metals, Proof Coins, Silver, Silver Coins, World Coins

June 13th 2013. South Atlantic News Agency. (http://en.mercopress.com)

The Falkland Islands and Ascension Island have released two coins from Pobjoy Mint to commemorate the life of former British Prime Minister Baroness Thatcher who passed away at the age of 87 on 8 April 2013.

Known as the Iron Lady, Margaret Thatcher became Britain’s first and only female Prime Minister as well as the longest serving Prime Minister of the 20th Century and was honored with a ceremonial funeral with full military honors at St Paul’s Cathedral, the only politician to be granted such a tribute since the death of Winston Churchill in 1965.

Born in 1925, the daughter of a grocer, she studied chemistry at Oxford but was involved in politics from an early age. She was elected leader of the Conservative Party in 1975 and made history four years later, becoming Prime Minister when the Conservatives won the elections of 1979, the first of three victories under her leadership. As Prime Minister she took a firm stance with the European Community and also on other issues, both domestic and foreign and thus transformed the nation.

Full article at source>

Link to product page at islandstampsandcoins.uk

 

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New 5p and 10p coins release FOUR times more nickel on the skin than previously expected and could trigger eczema and allergies

June 1, 2013 in British Coins, Coins, Health, News, Nickel Coins

By JENNY HOPE. 31 May 2013 (http://www.dailymail.co.uk)

  • New cost-cutting coating ‘could cause cracked, sore hands and eczema’
  • Cases of nickel allergy have soared in recent years – it now affects one in 10
  • It was thought coins didn’t release enough nickel to trigger allergy
  • But doctors say previous tests were flawed, exposing public to high levels

Your loose change may do more than burn a hole in your pocket.

There are claims it could also give you sore hands because of the nickel in the new 5p and 10p coins.

Doctors have issued an allergy warning over the coins introduced in January last year after tests revealed they release four times more nickel on to the skin than expected.

Handling them regularly could cause the hands to become cracked and sore and also trigger eczema, a study has shown.

Full article at source>

 

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Coins tell a story

May 16, 2013 in Coins, History, Nickel Coins, Pennies, USA Coins

Posted by Compmanager on May 15, 2013 (http://www.tuscolatoday.com)
May is a rather difficult month for me for several reasons.

First off, I was born in May. As the years have passed, celebrating that day isn’t as much fun as it used to be. A bigger breath is needed to blow out all of the candles before the fire department is called to attend the blaze.

Chuck, my oldest son was born in May, and he was also killed shortly after his 28th birthday while serving in Iraq. Then, there is Memorial Day to honor fallen soldiers.

While I’ve always had a great respect for those who serve their country, it wasn’t until my son was killed that the meaning of Memorial Day really hit home.

Over the last eight years I’ve visited Chuck’s grave several times and noticed a variety of coins on his headstone and on the graves of other soldiers. I never really thought about it much or that it had a special meaning.

A few months ago a letter was sent to me explaining the meaning of the coins left on a soldier’s grave who gave their life while serving in Armed Forces.

A coin left on a headstone or at the gravesite is meant as a message to the deceased soldier’s family that someone had visited the grave to pay respect.

Each coin left has a distinct meaning depending on the denomination of coin: Leaving a penny at the grave means simply that someone visited.

Leaving a nickel indicates that the visitor and the deceased trained at boot camp together, while a dime means the visitor served with the soldier in some capacity.

A quarter left at the grave tells the family the visitor was with the soldier when he was killed.

According to tradition, the money left is left at graves in national cemeteries and state veterans cemeteries is eventually collected, and the funds are put toward maintaining the cemetery or paying burial costs for indigent veterans.

According to the letter, leaving a coin became common during the Vietnam War because of the political controversy in the country over the war. Leaving a coin was seen as a practical way to communicate that a person had visited the grave rather than contacting the soldier’s family, which could become uncomfortable argument over politics relating to the war.

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Famous $3 Million Rare Nickel Among $100 Million Of Historic Money On Display In New Orleans

May 6, 2013 in Ancient Coins, Antique Coins, Auctions, Coin Shows, Coins, Collecting, Conventions, Gold, Gold Coins, History, Nickel Coins, Numismatic Societies and Clubs, Numismatica, Numismatics, Paper Money, Silver, Silver Coins, USA Coins, World Coins

Some of the world’s most famous rare coins and paper money, including multi-million dollar nickels and historic Louisiana money, will be publicly displayed at the National Money Show in New Orleans, May 9 – 11, 2013.

New Orleans, Louisiana (PRWEB) May 06, 2013 (www.prweb.com)

More than $100 million of historic rare coins and colorful currency, including the first public appearance of a rare nickel that recently sold for over $3 million and examples of early Louisiana money, are on display at the National Money Show (http://www.NationalMoneyShow.com) in the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, May 9 – 11, 2013.

The public can get appraisals of their old coins and paper money at this family-friendly, educational event where items ranging from a dollar to over a million dollars can be bought and sold.

“Money is history you can hold in your hands. Every coin and piece of paper money ever made has a story to tell about people, places or events,” said Tom Hallenbeck, President of the nonprofit, 27,000-member American Numismatic Association (http://www.money.org), sponsor of the National Money Show.

Among the historic and world famous numismatic treasures that are being publicly displayed for the first time in Louisiana during the show: the 1913 Liberty Head nickel that was sold in an auction last month for $3,172,500, a rare 1804-dated silver dollar valued at $3 million, and an example of the first coin authorized by President George Washington, a 1792 silver half disme (an early spelling of the word dime).

Other eye-opening displays include centuries-old Louisiana coins and bank notes and an exhibit of World War II money.

“We actually have two 1913 Liberty Head nickels here in New Orleans for the first time. Only five are known of that design and date, and two of them are on display here with a combined value of over $5 million. They were struck under mysterious circumstances at the Philadelphia Mint a century ago,” explained Hallenbeck.

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Walton Specimen 1913 Liberty Head Nickel Realizes $3.17 Million

April 26, 2013 in Antique Coins, Auctions, Coins, Collecting, News, Nickel Coins, Numismatica, Numismatics, Rare Coins, USA Coins

April 26, 2013 By Dennis Hengeveld (news.coinupdate.com)

One of the highlights in American numismatics was auctioned at the spring 2013 Central States Numismatic Society convention held in Chicago, IL. An example of the famed 1913 Liberty Head Nickel was sold by Heritage Auctions from Dallas, TX. The storied Walton Specimen, deemed to be the third finest of the five coins known to exist, realized $3,172,500 including the buyer’s premium.

There is a reason that the write-up in the auction catalog is one of the longest ever seen in any numismatic catalog,. First of all, it is not very often that a 100 year old coin that is so famed that even most casual collectors will be familiar with its rarity and back story. It also does not happen often (or at all) that the particular coin in question was deemed lost for over 40 years following an automobile accident in which the coin’s owner was tragically killed. And it almost never happens that one of the factors that brought the coin back into the numismatic theater was a substantial reward offered by Bowers and Merena.

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Million dollar nickel rolling to auction

April 25, 2013 in Antique Coins, Auctions, Coins, Collecting, Nickel Coins, Rare Coins, USA Coins

Pricey coin has rich backstory

By Lisa Black, Chicago Tribune reporter. April, 24th, 2013 (www.chicagotribune.com)

A rare 1913 Liberty Head nickel, stored unceremoniously in a closet for 40 years, could fetch more than $2.5 million when it’s auctioned in Schaumburg this week.

But what’s priceless is the story behind the coin — one of only five ever made. Starting with suspicious origins, the coin later survived a fiery car crash and was declared a fake before its eventual authentication.

Its former owner, George Walton, died in the 1962 crash en route to a coin show. Appraisers told his family the coin was fake, but his sister kept it, anyway.

“She put it in a padded envelope and wrote, ‘It’s not real,'” said Walton’s niece, Cheryl Myers of Virginia, one of four heirs working with Heritage Auctions. “She died … never knowing she had the real thing.”

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Santa Cruz club to slip rare coins into circulation

March 18, 2013 in Coins, Collecting, Nickel Coins, Numismatic Societies and Clubs, Numismatica, Numismatics, Rare Coins, USA Coins

By Kimberly White. Santa Cruz Sentinel. 03-16-2013 (http://www.mercurynews.com)

FELTON — Members of the Santa Cruz Coin Club will be up to their old tricks next month.

Five or six years ago, the local chapter of the American Numismatic Association secretly started slipping rare coins into circulation, hoping some eagle-eyed kindred spirits would find an Indian head penny or buffalo nickel while sorting through their pocket change.

Bill Higgins, the club’s treasurer, said they now do it every year in honor of National Coin Week, held this year April 21-27 with the theme “Buffalo Nickel Centennial: Black Diamond Shines Again.” The national numismatic association is celebrating by hosting events and educational activities centered around the Indian head/buffalo nickel, including Native American history and animals on coins.

The face of the Indian head/buffalo nickel is believed to be based on three American Indians, Chief Iron Tail of the Lakota Sioux, Chief Two Moons of the Cheyenne and a third who remains unidentified, according to the U.S. Mint. A bison, believed to have been modeled after a buffalo at a New York zoo, Black Diamond, graces its back.

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Numismatics on your mind?

February 6, 2013 in Coins, Collecting, Gold, Gold Coins, Nickel Coins, Numismatica, Numismatics, Paper Money, Silver, Silver Coins, USA Coins

February 5, 2013 by Bob Schreiner (http://www.lib.unc.edu) (University of North Carolina)

North Carolina Miscellany.

It’s not often that a story about numismatics makes the front page of the News and Observer, but it happened recently in the article “Humble Nickel from 1913 Likely to Fetch Millions.”

What’s numismatics, you ask? You aren’t the only one! It’s the collecting and study of coins and other types of money. What’s so interesting about money, other than nagging questions about whether one has enough of it? The N & O article is about a “trophy” coin: rare and highly desired by collectors with deep — very deep — pockets. Part of the appeal of this 1913 nickel is the mystery of how it was produced, the story of the North Carolinian who once owned it and then lost it, and of course its very high value.

But many pieces of currency have interesting stories to tell. Did you know that during the Civil War the State of North Carolina produced hundreds of varieties of paper money, denominated from five cents through $100? These are not the better-known paper money issued by the Confederacy. Both Confederate and state currencies confusingly circulated together to provide North Carolinians a medium of exchange. But the effort was not entirely successful. The paper money had no intrinsic value and was subject to counterfeiting, inflation, and discounting.

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Sometimes a nickel is worth millions

February 1, 2013 in Auctions, Nickel Coins, USA Coins

By: Steve Szkotak , The Associated Press (AP) (http://www.nbcnews.com)

A humble 5-cent coin with a storied past is headed to auction and bidding is expected to top $2 million a century after it was mysteriously minted.

The 1913 Liberty Head nickel is one of only five known to exist, but it’s the coin’s back story that adds to its cachet: It was surreptitiously and illegally cast, discovered in a car wreck that killed its owner, declared a fake, forgotten in a closet for decades and then found to be the real deal. It all adds up to an expected sale of $2.5 million or more when it goes on the auction block April 25 in suburban Chicago.

1913 Liberty Head Nickel

This image provided by Heritage Auctions shows an authentic 1913 Liberty Head nickel that was hidden in a Virginia closet for 41 years after its owners were mistakenly told it was a fake.

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