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Naples Archeological Museum reveals ‘hidden’ treasure

March 14, 2014 in Ancient Coins, Antique Coins, Archaeology, Coins, Collecting, Gold, Gold Coins, Greek Coins, History, Medals, Museums, News, Numismatica, Numismatics, Precious Metals, Rare Coins, Roman Coins, World Coins

Closed coin collection to be shown to the public on Sunday

Marh 14th, 2014  (http://www.ansamed.info/)

(ANSAmed) – NAPOLI – To hear talk of hidden treasure makes one think immediately of an old chest full of precious antique coins. This is exactly what awaits visitors to the National Archeological Museum of Naples on Sunday March 15, when the museum will open its doors to reveal a “secret” collection for one day – that of the museum’s coins, one of the most important collections in Italy with about 150,000 pieces, from coinage of ancient Greece to that of the Bourbon mint.

The name of the guided tour is “Coins and economy in the ancient world”. It is a rare opportunity rendered even more precious by the presence of archeologists and historians, experts in numismatics, who will explain not only the eras in which the coins were used, but also economic aspects linked to their use.

Coin collecting dates back to the 1500s, as demonstrates the Farnese collection, created in Rome but arriving in Naples through the Bourbon inheritance of Charles VII of Naples. The collection shows the choice of coins and medallions preferred by erudite and Renaissance coin collectors: portraits of illustrious men, architects of ancient history, representations of historic episodes and celebrated ancient monuments that have disappeared or are no longer identifiable. Another attentive and passionate collector was Cardinal Stefano Borgia, a learned prelate from the late eighteenth century with antiquarian interests, whose collection was sold by one of his descendants to the King of Naples Joachim Murat. The Borgia collection includes coins from series produced in Etruria, Umbria, Lazio, Rome and in the central Adriatic area of Italy.

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